Women feel just as men do from Jane Eyre by C.Bronte (1847)

Jane Eyre is the protagonist of the novel named after her, she is a governess and she likes her job and the people in the house. Thornfield Hall is an old, isolated villa, surrounded by gates and walls. Although Jane loves her job, she feels dissatisfied with her life in the country house where she is confined to the limited world of female occupations.
She is a passionate young woman, she longs for new experiences, she would like to travel to different places, meet people and establish new relationships.
She is endowed with a fervent imagination so, in her free time, she goes up to the third floor and reaches the roof through the trap door in the attic. From there, she looks at the horizon and tries to imagine what is beyond it. Imagination is what she relies on when she cannot find relief from her restlessness.
She often seeks solitude because, when she is alone, she can let her heart expand and indulge in the bright visions created by her imagination.

She knows people would blame her because in the Victorian Age women were supposed to confine themselves in female occupations while she's restless and longing to do more or learn more than women were allowed to, by custom.
However, she doesn't care and, in the last lines of the excerpt, she states that women 'feel just as men do' and vindicates the right for women to exercise their faculties with a wider range of possibilities just as men do.

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