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World Heritage Convention Appunti scolastici Premium

The Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention aim to facilitate the implementation of the Convention concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage by setting forth the procedure for:
- the inscription of properties on the World Heritage List and the List of World Heritage in Danger;
- the protection... Vedi di più

Esame di Aspetti teoretici e tecnici della conservazione docente Prof. M. Di Stefano

Anteprima

ESTRATTO DOCUMENTO

Sustainable use

World Heritage properties may support a variety of ongoing

119. and proposed uses that are ecologically and culturally

sustainable. The State Party and partners must ensure that

such sustainable use does not adversely impact the

outstanding universal value, integrity and/or authenticity of

the property. Furthermore, any uses should be ecologically

and culturally sustainable. For some properties, human use

would not be appropriate. 29

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

III. PROCESS FOR THE INSCRIPTION OF PROPERTIES

ON THE WORLD HERITAGE LIST

III.A Preparation of Nominations

The nomination document is the primary basis on which the

120. Committee considers the inscription of the properties on the

World Heritage List. All relevant information should be

included in the nomination document and it should be cross-

referenced to the source of information.

Annex 3 provides guidance to States Parties in preparing

121. nominations of specific types of properties.

Before States Parties begin to prepare a nomination of a

122. property for inscription on the World Heritage List, they

should become familiar with the nomination cycle, described

in Paragraph 168.

Participation of local people in the nomination process is

123. essential to enable them to have a shared responsibility with

the State Party in the maintenance of the property. States

Parties are encouraged to prepare nominations with the

participation of a wide variety of stakeholders, including site

managers, local and regional governments, local

communities, NGOs and other interested parties.

Preparatory Assistance, as described in Chapter VII.E, may

124. be requested by States Parties for the preparation of

nominations.

States Parties are encouraged to contact the Secretariat, which

125. can provide assistance throughout the nomination process.

The Secretariat can also provide:

126. a) assistance in identifying appropriate maps and

photographs and the national agencies from which

these may be obtained;

b) examples of successful nominations, of management

and legislative provisions;

c) guidance for nominating different types of

properties, such as Cultural Landscapes, Towns,

Canals, and Heritage Routes (see Annex 3)

d) guidance for nominating serial and transboundary

properties (see paragraphs 134-

139).

States Parties may submit draft nominations to the Secretariat

127.

30 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

for comment and review by of each year (see

30 September

paragraph 168). This submission of a draft nomination is

voluntary.

Nominations may be submitted

128. at any time during the year,

but only those nominations that are "complete" (see

paragraph 132) and received by the Secretariat on or before 1

will be considered for inscription on the World

February

Heritage List by the World Heritage Committee during the

following year. Only nominations of properties included in

the State Party's Tentative List will be examined by the

Committee (see paragraph 63).

III.B Format and content of nominations

Nominations of properties for inscription on the World

129. Heritage List should be prepared in accordance with the

format set out in Annex 5.

The format includes the following sections:

130. 1. Identification of the Property

2. Description of the Property

3. Justification for Inscription

4. State of conservation and factors affecting the property

5. Protection and Management

6. Monitoring

7. Documentation

8. Contact Information of responsible authorities

9. Signature on behalf of the State Party(ies)

Nominations to the World Heritage List are evaluated on

131. content rather than on appearance.

For a nomination to be considered as "complete", the

132. following requirements are to be met:

1. Identification of the Property

The boundaries of the property being proposed shall be clearly

defined, unambiguously distinguishing between the nominated

property and any buffer zone (when present) (see paragraphs

103-

107). Maps shall be sufficiently detailed to determine

precisely which area of land and/or water is nominated.

Officially up-to-date published topographic maps of the State

Party annotated to show the property boundaries shall be

provided if available. A nomination shall be considered

"incomplete" if it does not include clearly defined boundaries.

2. Description of the Property

The Description of the property shall include the identification 31

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

of the property, and an overview of its history and

development. All component parts that are mapped shall be

identified and described. In particular, where serial

nominations are proposed, each of the component parts shall be

clearly described. of the property shall describe

The History and Development

how the property has reached its present form and the

significant changes that it has undergone. This information

shall provide the important facts needed to support and give

substance to the argument that the property meets the criteria

of outstanding universal value and conditions of integrity

and/or authenticity.

3. Justification for Inscription

This section shall indicate the World Heritage criteria (see The comparative analyses

prepared by States Parties when

Paragraph 77) under which the property is proposed, together nominating properties for

with a clearly stated argument for the use of each criterion. inscription in the World Heritage

Based on the criteria, a proposed Statement of Outstanding List should not be confused with

the thematic studies prepared by

Universal Value (see paragraphs 49-

53and 155) of the property the Advisory Bodies at the

prepared by the State Party shall make clear why the property request of the Committee

is considered to merit inscription on the World Heritage List. A (paragraph 148 below)

comparative analysis of the property in relation to similar

properties, whether or not on the World Heritage List, both at Decision 7 EXT.COM 4A

the national and international levels, shall also be provided.

The comparative analysis shall explain the importance of the

nominated property in its national and international context.

Statements of integrity and/or authenticity shall be included

and shall demonstrate how the property satisfies the conditions

outlined in paragraphs 78-

95.

4. State of conservation and factors affecting the property

This section shall include accurate information on the present

state of conservation of the property (including information on

its physical condition of the property and conservation

measures in place). It shall also include a description of the

factors affecting the property (including threats). Information

provided in this section constitutes the baseline data which are

necessary to monitor the state of conservation of the nominated

property in the future.

5. Protection and management

Protection: Section 5 shall include the list of the legislative,

regulatory, contractual, planning, institutional and/ or

traditional measures most relevant to the protection of the

property and provide a detailed analysis of the way in which

this protection actually operates. Legislative, regulatory,

32 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

contractual planning and/or institutional texts, or an abstract

of the texts, shall also be attached in English or French.

Management: An appropriate management plan or other

management system is essential and shall be provided in the

nomination. Assurances of the effective implementation of the

management plan or other management system are also

expected.

A copy of the management plan or documentation of the

management system shall be annexed to the nomination. If the

management plan exists only in a language other than English

or French, an English or French detailed description of its

provisions shall be annexed.

A detailed analysis or explanation of the management plan or

a documented management system shall be provided.

A nomination which does not include the above-mentioned

documents is considered incomplete unless other documents

guiding the management of the property until the finalization

of the management plan are provided as outlined in paragraph

115.

6. Monitoring

States Parties shall include the key indicators proposed to

measure and assess the state of conservation of the property,

the factors affecting it, conservation measures at the property,

the periodicity of their examination, and the identity of the

responsible authorities.

7. Documentation

All necessary documentation to substantiate the nomination

shall be provided. In addition to what is indicated above, this

shall include photographs, 35 mm slides, image inventory and

photograph authorization form. The text of the nomination

shall be transmitted in printed form as well as in electronic

format (Diskette or CD-Rom).

8. Contact Information of responsible authorities

Detailed contact information of responsible authorities shall be

provided.

9. Signature on behalf of the State Party

The nomination shall conclude with the original signature of

the official empowered to sign it on behalf of the State Party. 33

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

10. Number of printed copies required

Nominations of cultural properties (excluding cultural

landscapes): 2 copies

Nominations of natural properties: 3 copies

Nominations of mixed properties and cultural landscapes: 4

copies

11. Paper and electronic format

Nominations shall be presented on A4-size paper (or "letter");

and in electronic format (diskette or CD-ROM). At least one

paper copy shall be presented in a loose-leaf format to

facilitate photocopying, rather than in a bound volume.

12. Sending

States Parties shall submit the nomination in English or French

duly signed, to:

UNESCO World Heritage Centre

7, place de Fontenoy

75352 Paris 07 SP

France

Tel: +33 (0) 1 4568 1136

Fax: +33 (0) 1 4568 5570

E-mail: wh-nominations@unesco.org

The Secretariat will retain all supporting documentation (maps,

133. plans, photographic material, etc.) submitted with the

nomination.

III.C Requirements for the nomination of different types of

properties

Transboundary properties Decision 7 EXT.COM 4A

A nominated property may occur:

134. a) on the territory of a single State Party, or

b) on the territory of all concerned States Parties having

adjacent borders (transboundary property).

Wherever possible, transboundary nominations should be

135. prepared and submitted by States Parties jointly in conformity

with Article 11.3 of the It is highly recommended

Convention.

that the States Parties concerned establish a joint management

committee or similar body to oversee the management of the

34 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

whole of a transboundary property.

Extensions to an existing World Heritage property located in

136. one State Party may be proposed to become transboundary

properties.

Serial properties

Serial properties will include component parts related because

137. they belong to:

a) the same historico – cultural group;

b) the same type of property which is characteristic of the

geographical zone;

c) the same geological, geomorphological formation, the

same biogeographic province, or the same ecosystem

type;

and provided it is the series as a whole – and not necessarily the

individual parts of it – which are of outstanding universal value. Decision 7 EXT.COM 4A

A serial nominated property may occur :

138. a) on the territory of a single State Party (serial national

property); or

b) within the territory of different States Parties, which

need not be contiguous and is nominated with the

consent of all States Parties concerned (serial

transnational property)

Serial nominations, whether from one State Party or multiple

139. States, may be submitted for evaluation over several

nomination cycles, provided that the first property nominated

is of outstanding universal value in its own right. States

Parties planning serial nominations phased over several

nomination cycles are encouraged to inform the Committee of

their intention in order to ensure better planning.

III.D Registration of nominations

On receipt of nominations from States Parties, the Secretariat

140. will acknowledge receipt, check for completeness and register

nominations. The Secretariat will forward complete

nominations to the relevant Advisory Bodies for evaluation. The

Secretariat will request any additional information from the

State Party and when required by Advisory Bodies. The

timetable for registration and processing of nominations is

detailed in paragraph 168. 35

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Decisions 26 COM 14 and

The Secretariat establishes and submits at each Committee

141. 28 COM 14B.57

session a list of all nominations received, including the date of

reception, an indication of their status "complete" or

"incomplete", as well as the date at which they are considered

as "complete" in conformity with paragraph 132.

A nomination passes through a cycle between the time of its

142. submission and the decision by the World Heritage Committee.

This cycle normally lasts one and a half years between

submission in February of Year 1 and the decision of the

Committee in June of Year 2.

III.E. Evaluation of nominations by the Advisory Bodies

The Advisory Bodies will evaluate whether or not properties

143. nominated by States Parties have outstanding universal value,

meet the conditions of integrity and/or authenticity and meet the

requirements of protection and management. The procedures

and format of ICOMOS and IUCN evaluations are described in

Annex 6.

Evaluations of cultural heritage nominations will be carried out

144. by ICOMOS.

Evaluations of natural heritage nominations will be carried out

145. by IUCN.

In the case of nominations of cultural properties in the category

146. of 'cultural landscapes', as appropriate, the evaluation will be

carried out by ICOMOS in consultation with IUCN. For mixed

properties, the evaluation will be carried out jointly by

ICOMOS and IUCN.

As requested by the World Heritage Committee or as necessary,

147. ICOMOS:

ICOMOS and IUCN will carry out to evaluate

thematic studies

proposed World Heritage properties in their regional, global or http://www.icomos.org/studi

es/

thematic context. These studies should be informed by a review

of the Tentative Lists submitted by States Parties and by reports IUCN:

of meetings on the harmonization of Tentative Lists, as well as http://www.iucn.org/themes/

by other technical studies performed by the Advisory Bodies wcpa/pubs/Worldheritage.ht

and qualified organizations and individuals. A list of those m

studies already completed may be found in section III of Annex

3, and on the Web addresses of the Advisory Bodies. These

studies should not be confused with the comparative analysis

to be prepared by States Parties in nominating properties for

inscription on the World Heritage List (see paragraph 132). Decision 28 COM

The following principles must guide the evaluations and

148. 14B.57.3

presentations of ICOMOS and IUCN. The evaluations and

presentations should:

36 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

a) adhere to the and the

World Heritage Convention

relevant and any additional

Operational Guidelines

policies set out by the Committee in its decisions;

b) be objective, rigorous and scientific in their evaluations;

c) be conducted to a consistent standard of

professionalism;

d) comply to standard format, both for evaluations and

presentations, to be agreed with the Secretariat and

include the name of the evaluator(s) who conducted

the site visit;

d) indicate clearly and separately whether the property

has outstanding universal value, meets the conditions

of integrity and/or authenticity, a management

plan/system and legislative protection;

f) evaluate each property systematically according to all

relevant criteria, including its state of conservation,

that is, by comparison with that of other

relatively,

properties of the same type, both inside and outside

the State Party's territory;

g) include references to Committee decisions and

requests concerning the nomination under

consideration; Decision 30 COM 13.13

h) not take into account or include any information

submitted by the State Party after as

28 February,

evidenced by the postmark, in the year in which the

nomination is considered. The State Party should be

informed when information has arrived after the

deadline and is not being taken into account in the

evaluation. This deadline should be rigorously

enforced; and

i) provide a justification for their views through a list of

references (literature) consulted, as appropriate. Decision 7 EXT.COM 4B.1

The Advisory Bodies are requested to forward to States Parties

149. by of each year any final question or request for

31 January

information that they may have after the examination of their

evaluation. 37

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Decision 7 EXT.COM 4B.1

The concerned States Parties are invited to send, at least two

150. working days before the opening of the session of the

Committee, a letter to the Chairperson, with copies to the

Advisory Bodies, detailing the factual errors they might have

identified in the evaluation of their nomination made by the

Advisory Bodies. This letter will be distributed in the working

languages to the members of the Committee and may be read by

the Chairperson following the presentation of the evaluation.

ICOMOS and IUCN make their recommendations under three

151. categories:

a) properties which are recommended for inscription

without reservation;

b) properties which are for inscription;

not recommended

c) nominations which are recommended for or

referral

deferral.

III.F Withdrawal of nominations

A State Party may a nomination it has submitted at

152. withdraw

any time prior to the Committee session at which it is scheduled

to be examined. The State Party should inform the Secretariat in

writing of its intention to withdraw the nomination. If the State

Party so wishes it can resubmit a nomination for the property,

which will be considered as a new nomination according to the

procedures and timetable outlined in paragraph 168.

III.G Decision of the World Heritage Committee

The World Heritage Committee decides whether a property

153. should or should not be inscribed on the World Heritage List,

referred or deferred.

Inscription

When deciding to inscribe a property on the World Heritage

154. List, the Committee, guided by the Advisory Bodies, adopts a

Statement of Outstanding Universal Value for the property.

The Statement of Outstanding Universal Value should include a

155. summary of the Committee's determination that the property has

outstanding universal value, identifying the criteria under which

the property was inscribed, including the assessments of the

conditions of integrity or authenticity, and of the requirements

for protection and management in force. The Statement of

Outstanding Universal Value shall be the basis for the future

protection and management of the property.

38 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

At the time of inscription, the Committee may also make other

156. recommendations concerning the protection and management of

the World Heritage property.

The Statement of Outstanding Universal Value (including the

157. criteria for which a specific property is inscribed on the World

Heritage List) will be set out by the Committee in its reports and

publications.

Decision not to inscribe

If the Committee decides that a property should

158. not be

on the World Heritage List, the nomination may not

inscribed

again be presented to the Committee except in exceptional

circumstances. These exceptional circumstances may include

new discoveries, new scientific information about the property,

or different criteria not presented in the original nomination. In

these cases, a new nomination shall be submitted.

Referral of Nominations

Nominations which the Committee decides back to the

159. to refer

State Party for additional information may be resubmitted to the

following Committee session for examination. The additional

information shall be submitted to the Secretariat by 1 February

of the year in which examination by the Committee is desired.

The Secretariat will immediately transmit it to the relevant

Advisory Bodies for evaluation. A referred nomination which

is not presented to the Committee within three years of the

original Committee decision will be considered as a new

nomination when it is resubmitted for examination, following

the procedures and timetable outlined in paragraph 168.

Deferral of Nominations

The Committee may decide a nomination for more in-

160. to defer

depth assessment or study, or a substantial revision by the State

Party. Should the State Party decide to resubmit the deferred

nomination, it shall be resubmitted to the Secretariat by 1

These nominations will then be revaluated by the

February.

relevant Advisory Bodies during the course of the full year and

a half evaluation cycle according to the procedures and

timetable outlined in paragraph 168.

III.H Nominations to be processed on an emergency basis

The normal timetable and definition of completeness for the

161. submission and processing of nominations will not apply in the

case of properties which, in the opinion of the relevant Advisory

Bodies, would meet the criteria for inscription

unquestionably

on the World Heritage List and which have suffered damage or 39

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

face serious and specific dangers from natural events or human

activities. Such nominations will be processed on an emergency

basis and may be inscribed simultaneously on the World

Heritage List and on the List of World Heritage in Danger (see

paragraphs 177-191).

162. The procedure for nominations to be processed on an

emergency basis is as follows:

a) A State Party presents a nomination with the request for

processing on an emergency basis. The State Party shall

have already included, or immediately include, the

property on its Tentative List.

b) The nomination shall:

i) describe and identify the property;

ii) justify its outstanding universal value according

to the criteria;

iii) justify its integrity and/or authenticity;

iv) describe its protection and management system;

v) describe the nature of the emergency, including

the nature and extent of the damage or danger

and showing that immediate action by the

Committee is necessary for the survival of the

property.

c) The Secretariat immediately transmits the nomination to

the relevant Advisory Bodies, requesting an assessment

of its outstanding universal value, and of the nature of

the emergency, damage and/or danger. A field visit may

be necessary if the relevant Advisory Bodies consider it

appropriate;

d) If the relevant Advisory Bodies determine that the

property unquestionably meets the criteria for

inscription, and that the requirements (see a) above) are

satisfied, the examination of the nomination will be

added to the agenda of the next session of the

Committee.

e) When reviewing the nomination the Committee will

also consider:

i) inscription on the List of World Heritage in

Danger;

ii) allocation of International Assistance to

complete the nomination; and

iii) follow-up missions as necessary by the

Secretariat and the relevant Advisory Bodies as

soon as possible after inscription.

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

40

III.I Modifications to the boundaries, to the criteria used to

justify inscription or to the name of a World Heritage

property

Minor modifications to the boundaries

A minor modification is one which has not a significant impact

163. on the extent of the property nor affects its outstanding universal

value.

If a State Party wishes to request a minor modification to the

164. boundaries of a property already on the World Heritage List, it

shall submit this by to the Committee through the

1 February

Secretariat, which will seek the advice of the relevant Advisory

Bodies. The Committee can approve such modification, or it

may consider that the modification to the boundary is

sufficiently important to constitute an extension of the property,

in which case the procedure for new nominations will apply.

Significant modifications to the boundaries

If a State Party wishes to significantly modify the boundary of a

165. property already on the World Heritage List, the State Party

shall submit this proposal as if it were a new nomination. This

re-nomination shall be presented by and will be

1 February

evaluated in the full year and a half cycle of evaluation

according to the procedures and timetable outlined in paragraph

168. This provision applies to extensions, as well as reductions.

Modifications to the criteria used to justify inscription on the

World Heritage List

Where a State Party wishes to have the property inscribed under

166. additional or different criteria other than those used for the

original inscription, it shall submit this request as if it were a

new nomination. This re-nomination shall be presented by 1

and will be evaluated in the full year and a half cycle

February

of evaluation according to the procedures and timetable outlined

in paragraph 168. Properties recommended will only be

evaluated under the new criteria and will remain on the World

Heritage List even if unsuccessful in having additional criteria

recognized.

Modification to the name of a World Heritage property

A State Party may request that the Committee authorize a

167. modification to the name of a property already inscribed on the

World Heritage List. A request for a modification to the name

shall be received by the Secretariat at least 3 months prior to 41

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

the meeting of the Committee.

III.J Timetable – overview

168. TIMETABLE PROCEDURES

Voluntary deadline for receipt of draft nominations

30 September (before Year 1) from States Parties by the Secretariat.

Secretariat to respond to the nominating State Party

15 November (before Year 1) concerning the completeness of the draft

nomination, and, if incomplete, to indicate the

missing information required to make the

nomination complete.

Deadline by which complete nominations must be

1 February Year 1 received by the Secretariat to be transmitted to the

relevant Advisory Bodies for evaluation.

Nominations shall be received by 17h00 GMT, or, if

the date falls on a weekend by 17h00 GMT the

preceeding Friday.

Nominations received after this date will be

examined in a future cycle.

Registration, assessment of completeness and

1 February – 1 March Year 1 transmission to the relevant Advisory Bodies.

The Secretariat registers each nomination,

acknowledges receipt to the nominating State Party

and inventories its contents. The Secretariat will

inform the nominating State Party whether or not the

nomination is complete.

Nominations that are not complete (see paragraph

132) will not be transmitted to the relevant Advisory

Bodies for evaluation. If a nomination is incomplete,

the State Party concerned will be advised of

information required to complete the nomination by

the deadline of 1 February of the following year in

order for the nomination to be examined in a future

cycle.

Nominations that are complete are transmitted to the

relevant Advisory Bodies for evaluation.

Deadline by which the Secretariat informs the State

1 March Year 1 Party of the receipt of a Nomination, whether it is

considered complete and whether it has been

received by 1 February.

Evaluation by the Advisory Bodies

March Year 1 – May Year 2

42 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

If necessary, the relevant Advisory Bodies may

31 January Year 2 request States Parties to submit additional

information during the evaluation and no later than

31 January Year 2.

Deadline by which additional information

28 February Year 2 requested by the relevant Advisory Bodies shall be

submitted by the State Party to them via the

Secretariat.

Additional information shall be submitted in the

same number of copies and electronic formats as

specified in Paragraph 132 to the Secretariat. To

avoid confusing new and old texts, if the additional

information submitted concerns changes to the main

text of the nomination, the State Party shall submit

these changes in an amended version of the original

text. The changes shall be clearly identified. An

electronic version (CD-ROM or diskette) of this new

text shall accompany the paper version.

The relevant Advisory Bodies deliver their

Six weeks prior to the annual World Heritage evaluations and recommendations to the Secretariat

Committee session Year 2 for transmission to the World Heritage Committee as

well as to States Parties.

Correction of factual errors by States Parties

At least two working days before the opening of

the annual World Heritage Committee session The concerned States Parties can send, at least two

Year 2 working days before the opening of the session of the

Committee, a letter to the Chairperson, with copies to

the Advisory Bodies, detailing the factual errors they

might have identified in the evaluation of their

nomination made by the Advisory Bodies.

The Committee examines the nominations and

Annual session of the World Heritage makes its decisions.

Committee (June/July) Year 2 Notification to the States Parties

Immediately following the annual session of the

World Heritage Committee The Secretariat notifies all States Parties whose

nominations have been examined by the Committee

of the relevant decisions of the Committee.

Following the decision of the World Heritage

Committee to inscribe a property on the World

Heritage List, the Secretariat writes to the State

Party and site managers providing a map of the

area inscribed and the Statement of Outstanding

Universal Value (to include reference to the criteria

met).

The Secretariat publishes the updated World Heritage

Immediately following the annual session of the List every year following the annual session of the

World Heritage Committee 43

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Committee.

The name of the States Parties having nominated the

properties inscribed on the World Heritage List are

presented in the published form of the List under the

following heading: “Contracting State having

submitted the nomination of the property in

accordance with the Convention".

The Secretariat forwards the published report of all

In the month following the closure of the annual the decisions of the World Heritage Committee to all

session of the World Heritage Committee States Parties.

44 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

IV. PROCESS FOR MONITORING THE STATE OF

CONSERVATION OF WORLD HERITAGE

PROPERTIES

IV.A Reactive Monitoring

Definition of Reactive Monitoring

Reactive Monitoring is the reporting by the Secretariat, other

169. sectors of UNESCO and the Advisory Bodies to the

Committee on the state of conservation of specific World

Heritage properties that are under threat. To this end, the

States Parties shall submit by to the Committee

1 February

through the Secretariat, specific reports and impact studies

each time exceptional circumstances occur or work is

undertaken which may have an effect on the state of

conservation of the property. Reactive Monitoring is also

foreseen in reference to properties inscribed, or to be

inscribed, on the List of World Heritage in Danger as set out

in paragraphs 177-

191.Reactive Monitoring is foreseen in

the procedures for the eventual deletion of properties from

the World Heritage List as set out in paragraphs 192- 198.

Objective of Reactive Monitoring Article 4 of the

When adopting the process of Reactive Monitoring, the Convention:

170. Committee was particularly concerned that all possible "Each State Party to this

measures should be taken to prevent the deletion of any Convention recognizes that the

property from the List and was ready to offer technical co- duty of ensuring the

identification, protection,

operation as far as possible to States Parties in this conservation, presentation and

connection. transmission to future

generations of the cultural and

natural heritage referred to in

Articles 1 and 2 and situated

on its territory, belongs

primarily to that State...".

The Committee recommends that States Parties co-operate

171. with the Advisory Bodies which have been asked by the

Committee to carry out monitoring and reporting on its behalf

on the progress of work undertaken for the preservation of

properties inscribed on the World Heritage List.

Information received from States Parties and/or other sources

The World Heritage Committee invites the States Parties to

172. the to inform the Committee, through the

Convention

Secretariat, of their intention to undertake or to authorize in

an area protected under the major restorations or

Convention

new constructions which may affect the outstanding

universal value of the property. Notice should be given as

soon as possible (for instance, before drafting basic 45

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

documents for specific projects) and before making any

decisions that would be difficult to reverse, so that the

Committee may assist in seeking appropriate solutions to

ensure that the outstanding universal value of the property is

fully preserved. Decision 27 COM 7B.106.2

The World Heritage Committee requests that reports of

173. missions to review the state of conservation of the World

Heritage properties include:

a) an indication of threats or significant improvement in

the conservation of the property since the last report

to the World Heritage Committee;

b) any follow-up to previous decisions of the World

Heritage Committee on the state of conservation of

the property;

c) information on any threat or damage to or loss of

outstanding universal value, integrity and/or

authenticity for which the property was inscribed on

the World Heritage List.

When the Secretariat receives information that a property

174. inscribed has seriously deteriorated, or that the necessary

corrective measures have not been taken within the time

proposed, from a source other than the State Party concerned,

it will, as far as possible, verify the source and the contents of

the information in consultation with the State Party concerned

and request its comments.

Decision by the World Heritage Committee

The Secretariat will request the relevant Advisory Bodies to

175. forward comments on the information received.

The information received, together with the comments of the

176. State Party and the Advisory Bodies, will be brought to the

attention of the Committee in the form of a state of

conservation report for each property, which may take one or

more of the following steps:

a) it may decide that the property has not seriously

deteriorated and that no further action should be taken;

b) when the Committee considers that the property has

seriously deteriorated, but not to the extent that its

restoration is impossible, it may decide that the

property be maintained on the List, provided that the

State Party takes the necessary measures to restore the

property within a reasonable period of time. The

46 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Committee may also decide that technical co-

operation be provided under the World Heritage

Fund for work connected with the restoration of the

property, proposing to the State Party to request such

assistance, if it has not already been done;

c) when the requirements and criteria set out in

paragraphs 177-

182 are met, the Committee may

decide to inscribe the property on the List of World

Heritage in Danger according to the procedures set out

in paragraphs 183-

189;

d) when there is evidence that the property has

deteriorated to the point where it has irretrievably lost

those characteristics which determined its inscription

on the List, the Committee may decide to delete the

property from the List. Before any such action is taken,

the Secretariat will inform the State Party concerned.

Any comments which the State Party may make will

be brought to the attention of the Committee;

e) when the information available is not sufficient to

enable the Committee to take one of the measures

described in a), b), c) or d) above, the Committee may

decide that the Secretariat be authorized to take the

necessary action to ascertain, in consultation with the

State Party concerned, the present condition of the

property, the dangers to the property and the feasibility

of adequately restoring the property, and to report to

the Committee on the results of its action; such

measures may include the sending of a fact-finding or

the consultation of specialists. In cases where

emergency action is required, the Committee may

authorize the financing from the World Heritage Fund

of the Emergency Assistance that is required.

IV.B The List of World Heritage in Danger

Guidelines for the inscription of properties on the List of

World Heritage in Danger

In accordance with Article 11, paragraph 4, of the

177. Convention,

the Committee may inscribe a property on the List of World

Heritage in Danger when the following requirements are met:

a) the property under consideration is on the World

Heritage List;

b) the property is threatened by serious and specific danger;

c) major operations are necessary for the conservation of 47

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

the property;

d) assistance under the has been requested for

Convention

the property; the Committee is of the view that its

assistance in certain cases may most effectively be

limited to messages of its concern, including the message

sent by inscription of a property on the List of World

Heritage in Danger and that such assistance may be

requested by any Committee member or the Secretariat.

Criteria for the inscription of properties on the List of World

Heritage in Danger

A World Heritage property - as defined in Articles 1 and 2 of

178. the - can be inscribed on the List of World

Convention

Heritage in Danger by the Committee when it finds that the

condition of the property corresponds to at least one of the

criteria in either of the two cases described below.

In the case of

179. cultural properties:

- The property is faced with

a) ASCERTAINED DANGER

specific and proven imminent danger, such as:

i) serious deterioration of materials;

ii) serious deterioration of structure and/or

ornamental features;

iii) serious deterioration of architectural or town-

planning coherence;

iv) serious deterioration of urban or rural space,

or the natural environment;

v) significant loss of historical authenticity;

vi) important loss of cultural significance.

48 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

b) POTENTIAL DANGER - The property is faced with

threats which could have deleterious effects on its

inherent characteristics. Such threats are, for example:

i) modification of juridical status of the property

diminishing the degree of its protection;

ii) lack of conservation policy;

iii) threatening effects of regional planning

projects;

iv) threatening effects of town planning;

v) outbreak or threat of armed conflict;

vi) gradual changes due to geological, climatic or

other environmental factors.

In the case of

180. natural properties:

- The property is faced with

a) ASCERTAINED DANGER

specific and proven imminent danger, such as:

i) A serious decline in the population of the

endangered species or the other species of

outstanding universal value for which the

property was legally established to protect,

either by natural factors such as disease or by

man-made factors such as poaching.

ii) Severe deterioration of the natural beauty or

scientific value of the property, as by human

settlement, construction of reservoirs which

flood important parts of the property, industrial

and agricultural development including use of

pesticides and fertilizers, major public works,

mining, pollution, logging, firewood collection,

etc.

iii) Human encroachment on boundaries or in

upstream areas which threaten the integrity of

the property.

b) POTENTIAL DANGER - The property is faced with

major threats which could have deleterious effects on its

inherent characteristics. Such threats are, for example:

i) a modification of the legal protective status of

the area;

ii) planned resettlement or development projects 49

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

within the property or so situated that the

impacts threaten the property;

iii) outbreak or threat of armed conflict;

iv) the management plan or management system is

lacking or inadequate, or not fully

implemented.

In addition, the factor or factors which are threatening the

181. integrity of the property must be those which are amenable to

correction by human action. In the case of cultural properties,

both natural factors and man-made factors may be threatening,

while in the case of natural properties, most threats will be

man-made and only very rarely a natural factor (such as an

epidemic disease) will threaten the integrity of the property. In

some cases, the factors threatening the integrity of a property

may be corrected by administrative or legislative action, such

as the cancelling of a major public works project or the

improvement of legal status.

The Committee may wish to bear in mind the following

182. supplementary factors when considering the inclusion of a

cultural or natural property in the List of World Heritage in

Danger:

a) Decisions which affect World Heritage properties are

taken by Governments after balancing all factors. The

advice of the World Heritage Committee can often be

decisive if it can be given before the property becomes

threatened.

b) Particularly in the case of ascertained danger, the

physical or cultural deteriorations to which a property

has been subjected should be judged according to the

intensity of its effects and analyzed case by case.

c) Above all in the case of potential danger to a property,

one should consider that:

i) the threat should be appraised according to the

normal evolution of the social and economic

framework in which the property is situated;

ii) it is often impossible to assess certain

threats - such as the threat of armed conflict - as

to their effect on cultural or natural properties;

iii) some threats are not imminent in nature, but

can only be anticipated, such as demographic

growth.

d) Finally, in its appraisal the Committee should take into

50 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

account any cause of unknown or unexpected origin

which endangers a cultural or natural property.

Procedure for the inscription of properties on the List of World

Heritage in Danger

When considering the inscription of a property on the List of

183. World Heritage in Danger, the Committee shall develop, and

adopt, as far as possible, in consultation with the State Party

concerned, a programme for corrective measures.

In order to develop the programme of corrective measures

184. referred to in the previous paragraph, the Committee shall

request the Secretariat to ascertain, as far as possible in co-

operation with the State Party concerned, the present condition

of the property, the dangers to the property and the feasibility

of undertaking corrective measures. The Committee may

further decide to send a mission of qualified observers from the

relevant Advisory Bodies or other organizations to visit the

property, evaluate the nature and extent of the threats and

propose the measures to be taken.

The information received, together with the comments as

185. appropriate of the State Party and the relevant Advisory Bodies

or other organizations, will be brought to the attention of the

Committee by the Secretariat.

The Committee shall examine the information available and

186. take a decision concerning the inscription of the property on

the List of World Heritage in Danger. Any such decision

shall be taken by a majority of two-thirds of the Committee

members present and voting. The Committee will then define

the programme of corrective action to be taken. This

programme will be proposed to the State Party concerned for

immediate implementation.

The State Party concerned shall be informed of the

187. Committee's decision and public notice of the decision shall

immediately be issued by the Committee, in accordance with

Article 11.4 of the Convention.

The Secretariat publishes the updated List of World Heritage in

188. Danger in printed form and is also available at the following

Web address: http://whc.unesco.org/en/danger

The Committee shall allocate a specific, significant portion

189. of the World Heritage Fund to financing of possible

assistance to World Heritage properties inscribed on the List

of World Heritage in Danger.

Regular review of the state of conservation of properties on the

List of World Heritage in Danger 51

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

The Committee shall review annually the state of conservation

190. of properties on the List of World Heritage in Danger. This

review shall include such monitoring procedures and expert

missions as might be determined necessary by the Committee.

On the basis of these regular reviews, the Committee shall

191. decide, in consultation with the State Party concerned,

whether:

a) additional measures are required to conserve the

property;

b) to delete the property from the List of World Heritage

in Danger if the property is no longer under threat;

c) to consider the deletion of the property from both the

List of World Heritage in Danger and the World

Heritage List if the property has deteriorated to the

extent that it has lost those characteristics which

determined its inscription on the World Heritage List,

in accordance with the procedure set out in

paragraphs 192- 198.

IV.C Procedure for the eventual deletion of properties from the

World Heritage List

The Committee adopted the following procedure for the

192. deletion of properties from the World Heritage List in cases:

a) where the property has deteriorated to the extent that

it has lost those characteristics which determined its

inclusion in the World Heritage List; and

b) where the intrinsic qualities of a World Heritage site

were already threatened at the time of its nomination

by action of man and where the necessary corrective

measures as outlined by the State Party at the time,

have not been taken within the time proposed (see

paragraph 116).

When a property inscribed on the World Heritage List has

193. seriously deteriorated, or when the necessary corrective

measures have not been taken within the time proposed, the

State Party on whose territory the property is situated should so

inform the Secretariat.

When the Secretariat receives such information from a

194. source other than the State Party concerned, it will, as far as

possible, verify the source and the contents of the

information in consultation with the State Party concerned

and request its comments.

52 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

The Secretariat will request the relevant Advisory Bodies to

195. forward comments on the information received.

The Committee will examine all the information available

196. and will take a decision. Any such decision shall, in

accordance with Article 13 (8) of the be taken

Convention,

by a majority of two-thirds of its members present and

voting. The Committee shall not decide to delete any

property unless the State Party has been consulted on the

question.

The State Party shall be informed of the Committee's

197. decision and public notice of this decision shall be

immediately given by the Committee.

If the Committee's decision entails any modification to the

198. World Heritage List, this modification will be reflected in the

next updated List that is published. 53

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

V. PERIODIC REPORTING ON THE

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE WORLD HERITAGE

CONVENTION

V.A Objectives Article 29 of the

States Parties are requested to submit reports to the World

199. and

Heritage Convention

UNESCO General Conference through the World Heritage Resolutions of the 11th

Committee on the legislative and administrative provisions session of the General

Assembly of States Parties

they have adopted and other actions which they have taken th session of

(1997) and the 29

for the application of the including the state of

Convention, the UNESCO General

conservation of the World Heritage properties located on Conference.

their territories.

States Parties may request expert advice from the Advisory

200. Bodies and the Secretariat, which may also (with agreement

of the States Parties concerned) commission further expert

advice.

Periodic Reporting serves four main purposes:

201. a) to provide an assessment of the application of the

by the State Party;

World Heritage Convention

b) to provide an assessment as to whether the outstanding

universal value of the properties inscribed on the World

Heritage List is being maintained over time;

c) to provide up-dated information about the World

Heritage properties to record the changing

circumstances and state of conservation of the

properties;

d) to provide a mechanism for regional co-operation and

exchange of information and experiences between

States Parties concerning the implementation of the

and World Heritage conservation.

Convention

Periodic Reporting is important for more effective long term

202. conservation of the properties inscribed, as well as to

strengthen the credibility of the implementation of the

Convention.

V.B. Procedure and Format Decision 22 COM VI.7

World Heritage Committee:

203. a) adopted the Format and Explanatory Notes set out in

Annex 7;

b) invited States Parties to submit periodic reports every

54 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

six years;

c) decided to examine the States Parties’ periodic

reports region by region according to the following

table: Examination of Year of Examination

Region properties inscribed up by Committee

to and including

Arab States 1992 December 2000

Africa 1993 December 2001/July

2002

Asia and the Pacific 1994 June-July 2003

Latin America and the 1995 June-July2004

Caribbean

Europe and North 1996/1997 June-July 2005/2006

America

d) requested the Secretariat, jointly with the Advisory

Bodies, and making use of States Parties, competent

institutions and expertise available within the region,

to develop regional strategies for the periodic

reporting process as per the timetable established

under c) above.

The above-mentioned regional strategies should respond to

204. specific characteristics of the regions and should promote co-

ordination and synchronization between States Parties,

particularly in the case of transboundary properties. The

Secretariat will consult States Parties with regard to the

development and implementation of those regional strategies.

After the first six-year cycle of periodic reports, each region

205. will be assessed again in the same order as indicated in the

table above. Following the first six-year cycle, there may be

a pause for evaluation to assess and revise the periodic

reporting mechanism before a new cycle is initiated. This Format was adopted by the

The Format for the periodic reports by the States Parties

206. Committee at its 22nd session

consists of two sections: (Kyoto 1998) and may be

revised following the

completion of the first cycle of

a) refers to the legislative and administrative

Section I Periodic Reporting in 2006. For

provisions which the State Party has adopted and other this reason, the Format has not

actions which it has taken for the application of the been revised.

together with details of the experience

Convention,

acquired in this field. This particularly concerns the

general obligations defined in specific articles of the

Convention. 55

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

b) refers to the state of conservation of specific

Section II

World Heritage properties located on the territory of the

State Party concerned. This Section should be

completed for each World Heritage property.

Explanatory Notes are provided with the Format in Annex 7.

In order to facilitate management of information, States

207. Parties are requested to submit reports, in English or French,

in electronic as well as in printed form to :

UNESCO World Heritage Centre

7, place de Fontenoy

75352 Paris 07 SP

France

Tél: +33 (0)1 45 68 15 71

Fax: +33 (0)1 45 68 55 70

Email: wh-info@unesco.org

V.C Evaluation and Follow Up

The Secretariat consolidates national reports into Regional

208. State of the World Heritage reports, which are available in

electronic format at the following Web address

http://whc.unesco.org/en/publications and in paper version

(series World Heritage Papers).

The World Heritage Committee carefully reviews issues

209. raised in Periodic Reports and advises the States Parties of

the regions concerned on matters arising from them.

The Committee requested the Secretariat with the Advisory

210. Bodies, in consultation with the relevant States Parties, to

develop long-term follow-up Regional Programmes

structured according to its Strategic Objectives and to submit

them for its consideration. These should accurately reflect the

needs of World Heritage in the Region and facilitate the

granting of International Assistance. The Committee also

expressed its support to ensure direct links between the

Strategic Objectives and the International Assistance.

56 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

VI. ENCOURAGING SUPPORT FOR THE WORLD

HERITAGE CONVENTION Article 27 of the World

VI.A Objectives Heritage Convention

The objectives are:

211. a) to enhance capacity-building and research;

b) to raise the general public’s awareness, understanding

and appreciation of the need to preserve cultural and

natural heritage;

c) to enhance the function of World Heritage in the life Article 5(a) of the World

of the community; and Heritage Convention

d) to increase the participation of local and national

populations in the protection and presentation of

heritage.

VI.B Capacity-building and research Budapest Declaration on World

The Committee seeks to develop capacity-building within the

212. Heritage (2002)

States Parties in conformity with its Strategic Objectives.

The Global Training Strategy Global Training Strategy for

Recognizing the high level of skills and multidisciplinary

213. World Cultural and Natural

approach necessary for the protection, conservation, and Heritage adopted by the World

presentation of the World Heritage, the Committee has Heritage Committee at its 25th

session (Helsinki, Finland,

adopted a Global Training Strategy for World Cultural and 2001) (see ANNEX X of

Natural Heritage. The primary goal of the Global Training document WHC-

Strategy is to ensure that necessary skills are developed by a 01/CONF.208/24).

wide range of actors for better implementation of the

In order to avoid overlap and effectively

Convention.

implement the Strategy, the Committee will ensure links to

other initiatives such as the Global Strategy for a

Representative, Balanced and Credible World Heritage List

and Periodic Reporting. The Committee will annually review

relevant training issues, assess training needs, review annual

reports on training initiatives, and make recommendations

for future training initiatives.

National training strategies and regional co-operation

States Parties are encouraged to ensure that their

214. professionals and specialists at all levels are adequately

trained. To this end, States Parties are encouraged to develop

national training strategies and include regional co-operation

for training as part of their strategies. 57

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Research

The Committee develops and coordinates international co-

215. operation in the area of research needed for the effective

implementation of the States Parties are also

Convention.

encouraged to make resources available to undertake

research, since knowledge and understanding are

fundamental to the identification, management, and

monitoring of World Heritage properties.

International Assistance

Training and Research Assistance may be requested by

216. States Parties from the World Heritage Fund (see

Chapter VII).

VI.C Awareness-raising and education

Awareness-raising

States Parties are encouraged to raise awareness of the need

217. to preserve World Heritage. In particular, they should ensure

that World Heritage status is adequately marked and

promoted on-site.

The Secretariat provides assistance to States Parties in

218. developing activities aimed at raising public awareness of the

and informing the public of the dangers

Convention

threatening World Heritage. The Secretariat advises States

Parties regarding the preparation and implementation of on-

site promotional and educational projects to be funded

through International Assistance. The Advisory Bodies and

appropriate State agencies may also be solicited to provide

advice on such projects.

Education

The World Heritage Committee encourages and supports the

219. development of educational materials, activities and

programmes.

International Assistance Article 27.2 of the

States Parties are encouraged to develop educational World

220. Heritage Convention

activities related to World Heritage with, wherever possible,

the participation of schools, universities, museums and other

local and national educational authorities.

58 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

"World Heritage in Young

The Secretariat, in co-operation with the UNESCO

221. Hands" is available at the

Education Sector and other partners, produces and publishes following Web address

a World Heritage Educational Resource Kit, "World Heritage http://whc.unesco.org/educatio

n/index.htm

in Young Hands", for use in secondary schools around the

world. The Kit is adaptable for use at other educational

levels.

International Assistance may be requested by States Parties

222. from the World Heritage Fund for the purpose of developing

and implementing awareness-raising and educational

activities or programmes (see Chapter VII). 59

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

VII. THE WORLD HERITAGE FUND AND

INTERNATIONAL ASSISTANCE

VII.A The World Heritage Fund Article 15 of the

The World Heritage Fund is a trust fund, established by the World

223. Heritage Convention.

in conformity with the provisions of the

Convention

Financial Regulations of UNESCO. The resources of the

Fund consist of compulsory and voluntary contributions

made by States Parties to the and any other

Convention,

resources authorized by the Fund’s regulations.

The financial regulations for the Fund are set out in document

224. WHC/7 available at the following Web address:

http://whc.unesco.org/en/financialregulations

VII.B. Mobilization of other technical and financial resources

and partnerships in support of the World Heritage

Convention

To the extent possible, the World Heritage Fund should be

225. used to mobilize additional funds for International

Assistance from other sources.

The Committee decided that contributions offered to the

226. World Heritage Fund for international assistance campaigns

and other UNESCO projects for any property inscribed on

the World Heritage List shall be accepted and used as

international assistance pursuant to Section V of the

and in conformity with the modalities

Convention,

established for carrying out the campaign or project. Article 15(3) of the

States Parties are invited to provide support to the World

227. Heritage Convention

in addition to obligatory contributions paid to the

Convention

World Heritage Fund. This voluntary support can be

provided through additional contributions to the World

Heritage Fund or direct financial and technical contributions

to properties.

States Parties are encouraged to participate in international

228. fund-raising campaigns launched by UNESCO and aimed at

protecting World Heritage.

States Parties and others who anticipate making contributions

229. towards these campaigns or other UNESCO projects for World

Heritage properties are encouraged to make their contributions

through the World Heritage Fund. Article 17 of the

States Parties are encouraged to promote the establishment World

230. Heritage Convention

of national, public and private foundations or associations

60 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

aimed at raising funds to support World Heritage

conservation efforts.

The Secretariat provides support in mobilizing financial and

231. technical resources for World Heritage conservation. To this

end, the Secretariat develops partnerships with public and

private institutions in conformity with the Decisions and the

Guidelines issued by the World Heritage Committee and

UNESCO regulations. "Directives concerning

The Secretariat should refer to the “Directives concerning

232. UNESCO's co-operation with

UNESCO’s co-operation with private extra-budgetary private extra-budgetary

funding sources” and “Guidelines for mobilizing private funding sources" (Annex to

the Decision 149 EX/Dec. 7.5)

funds and criteria for selecting potential partners” to govern and "Guidelines for

external fund-raising in favour of the World Heritage Fund. mobilizing private funds and

These documents are available at the following Web address: criteria for selecting potential

partners" (Annex to the

http://whc.unesco.org/en/privatefunds Decision 156 EX/Dec. 9.4)

VII.C International Assistance See Articles 13 (1&2) and 19-

The provides International Assistance to States

233. Convention 26 of the World Heritage

Parties for the protection of the world cultural and natural Convention.

heritage located on their territories and inscribed, or

potentially suitable for inscription on the World Heritage

List. International Assistance should be seen as

supplementary to national efforts for the conservation and

management of World Heritage and Tentative List properties

when adequate resources cannot be secured at the national

level. Section IV of the

International Assistance is primarily financed from the World

234. Heritage Convention

World Heritage Fund, established under the World Heritage

Convention. The Committee determines the budget for

International Assistance on a biennial basis. Decision 30 COM 14A

The World Heritage Committee co-ordinates and allocates

235. types of International Assistance in response to State Party

requests. These types of International Assistance, described

in the summary table set out below, in order of priority are:

a) Emergency assistance

b) Preparatory assistance

c) Conservation and Management assistance

(incorporating assistance for training and research,

technical co-operation and promotion and education). 61

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

VII.D Principles and priorities for International Assistance Article 13(1) of the

Priority is given to International Assistance for properties World

236. Heritage Convention.

inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger. The

Committee created a specific budget line to ensure that a

significant portion of assistance from the World Heritage Fund

is allocated to properties inscribed on the List of World

Heritage in Danger. Decision 13 COM XII.34

States Parties in arrears of payment of their compulsory or

237. voluntary contributions to the World Heritage Fund are not

eligible for international assistance, it being understood that

this provision does not apply to requests for emergency

assistance. Decisions 26 COM 17.2,

To support its Strategic Objectives, the Committee also

238. 26 COM 20 and 26 COM 25.3

allocates International Assistance in conformity with the

priorities set out by Regional Programmes. These

Programmes are adopted as follow up to Periodic Reports

and regularly reviewed by the Committee based on the needs

of States Parties identified in Periodic Reports (see

chapter V).

In addition to the priorities outlined in paragraphs 236- 238

239. above, the following considerations govern the Committee's

decisions in granting International Assistance:

a) the likelihood that the assistance will have a catalytic

and multiplier effect (“seed money”) and promote

financial and technical contributions from other

sources; Decision 31 COM 18B

b) when funds available are limited and a selection has

to be made, preference is given to:

• a Least Developed Country or Low Income

Economy as defined by the United Nations

Economic and Social Council's Committee for

Development Policy, or

• a Lower Middle Income Country as defined by

the World Bank, or

• a Small Island Developing State (SIDS), or

• a State Party in a post-conflict situation;

c) the urgency of the protective measures to be taken at

World Heritage properties;

d) whether the legislative, administrative and, wherever

possible, financial commitment of the recipient State

Party is available to the activity; Paragraph 26 of

e) the impact of the activity on furthering the Strategic Operational

Guidelines

62 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Objectives decided by the Committee; Decision 20 COM XII

f) the degree to which the activity responds to needs

identified through the reactive monitoring process

and/or the analysis of regional Periodic Reports;

g) the exemplary value of the activity in respect to

scientific research and the development of cost

effective conservation techniques;

h) the cost of the activity and expected results; and

i) the educational value both for the training of experts

and for the general public. 65% of the total International

A balance will be maintained in the allocation of resources to

240. Assistance budget is set aside

activities for cultural and natural heritage. This balance is for cultural properties and 35%

reviewed and decided upon on a regular basis by the for natural properties

Committee. Decision 31 COM 18B

VII.E Summary Table

241. Deadline for Authority for

Type of Purpose Budget ceilings submission of approval

international request

assistance

Emergency This assistance may be requested to address ascertained or Up to US$ At any time Director of the

Assistance potential threats facing properties included on the List of World 5.000 World Heritage

Heritage in Danger and the World Heritage List which have Centre

suffered severe damage or are in imminent danger of severe

damage due to sudden, unexpected phenomena. Such phenomena

may include land subsidence, extensive fires, explosions, At any time Chairperson of

Between US$

flooding or man-made disasters including war. This assistance the Committee

5.001 and

does not concern cases of damage or deterioration caused by 75.000

gradual processes of decay, pollution or erosion. It addresses

emergency situations strictly relating to the conservation of a

World Heritage property (see Decision 28 COM 10B 2.c). It may 1 February Committee

Over US$

be made available, if necessary, to more than one World Heritage 75.000

property in a single State Party (see Decision 6 EXT. COM 15.2).

The budget ceilings relate to a single World Heritage property.

The assistance may be requested to :

(i) undertake emergency measures for the safeguarding

of the property;

(ii) draw up an emergency plan for the property. 63

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Preparatory This assistance may be requested to: Up to US$ At any time Director of the

assistance 5.000 World Heritage

(i) prepare or update national Tentative Lists of Centre

properties suitable for inscription on the World

Heritage List; At any time Chairperson of

Between US$ the Committee

5.001 and

(ii) organize meetings for the harmonization of national 30.000

Tentative Lists within the same geo-cultural area;

(iii) prepare nominations of properties for inscription on

the World Heritage List (this may include the

preparation of a comparative analysis of the

property in relation to other similar properties (see

3.c of Annex 5);

(iv) prepare requests for training and research assistance

and for technical co-operation for World Heritage

properties.

Requests by States Parties whose heritage in un-represented or

under-represented in the World Heritage List will be given

priority for preparatory assistance.

Conservation This assistance may be requested for:

and

Management Only for Only for

Only for

(i) the training of staff and specialists at all levels in

Assistance requests falling requests falling

requests falling

the fields of identification, monitoring, under items (i) under items (i)

under items (i)

conservation, management and presentation of

(incorporating to (vi): to (vi):

to (vi):

World Heritage, with an emphasis on group

Training and training;

Research Up to US$ At any time Director of the

assistance, (ii) scientific research benefiting World Heritage 5.000 World Heritage

Technical co- properties; Centre

operation

assistance and (iii) studies on the scientific and technical problems of

Promotion and At any time Chairperson of

conservation, management, and presentation of Between US$

education the Committee

World Heritage properties. 5.001 and

assistance) 30.000

Note: Requests for support for individual training

courses from UNESCO should be submitted on the 1 February Committee

standard “Application for fellowship” form Over US$

available from the Secretariat. 30.000

(iv) provision of experts, technicians and skilled labour

for the conservation, management, and presentation

of properties inscribed on the List of World

Heritage in Danger and the World Heritage List;

(v) supply of equipment which the State Party requires

for the conservation, management, and presentation

of properties inscribed on the List of World

Heritage in Danger and the World Heritage List;

(vi) low-interest or interest-free loans for undertaking

activities for the conservation, management, and

presentation of properties inscribed on the List of

World Heritage in Danger and the World Heritage

List, which may be repayable on a long-term basis.

(vii) At the regional and international levels for

Programmes, activities and the holding of meetings Only for Only for Only for

that could: requests falling requests falling requests falling

- help to create interest in the within the under items under items under items (vii)

Convention

countries of a given region; (vii) and (viii): (vii) and (viii): and (viii):

- create a greater awareness of the different issues

related to the implementation of the to

Convention Up to US$ At any time Director of the

promote more active involvement in its 5,000 World Heritage

application; Centre

- be a means of exchanging experiences;

- stimulate joint education, information and Between US$

promotional programmes and activities, 5,001 and At any time Chairperson of

especially when they involve the participation of 10,000 the Committee

young people for the benefit of World Heritage

64 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

conservation.

(viii) At the national level for:

- meetings specifically organized to make the

better known, especially amongst

Convention

young people, or for the creation of national

World Heritage associations, in accordance with

Article 17 of the Convention;

- preparation and discussion of education and

information material (such as brochures,

publications, exhibitions, films, multimedia tools)

for the general promotion of the and

Convention

the World Heritage List and not for the promotion

of a particular property, and especially for young

people.

VII.F Procedure and format

All States Parties submitting requests for international

242. assistance are encouraged to consult the Secretariat and the

Advisory Bodies during the conceptualization, planning and

elaboration of each request. To facilitate States Parties’ work,

examples of successful international assistance requests may

be provided upon request.

The application form for International Assistance is presented

243. in Annex 8 and the types, amounts, deadlines for submission

and the authorities responsible for approval are outlined in the

summary table in Chapter VII.E.

The request should be submitted in English or French, duly

244. signed and transmitted by the National Commission for

UNESCO, the State Party Permanent Delegation to UNESCO

and/or appropriate governmental Department or Ministry to the

following address:

UNESCO World Heritage Centre

7, place de Fontenoy

75352 Paris 07 SP

France

Tel: +33 (0) 1 4568 1276

Fax: +33 (0) 1 4568 5570

E-mail: wh-intassistance@unesco.org

Requests for international assistance may be submitted by

245. electronic mail by the State Party but must be accompanied by

an officially signed hard copy or be filled-in using the online

format on the World Heritage Centre’s Website at the

following address: http://whc.unesco.org 65

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

It is important that all information requested in this

246. application form is provided. If appropriate or necessary,

requests may be supplemented by additional information,

reports, etc.

VII.G Evaluation and approval of International Assistance

requests

Provided that a request for assistance from a State Party is

247. complete, the Secretariat, with the assistance of the Advisory

Bodies, for requests above US$ 5,000, will process each

request in a timely manner, as follows. Decision 13 COM XII.34

All requests for international assistance for cultural heritage

248. Decision 31 COM 18B

are evaluated by ICOMOS and ICCROM, except requests for

less than US$ 5,000. Decision 31 COM 18B

All requests for international assistance for mixed heritage are

249. evaluated by ICOMOS, ICCROM and IUCN, except requests

for less than US$ 5,000. Decision 31 COM 18B

All requests for international assistance for natural heritage are

250. evaluated by IUCN, except requests for less than US$ 5,000. Decision 31 COM 18B

The evaluation criteria used by the Advisory Bodies are

251. outlined in Annex 9. Decision 31 COM 18B

All requests for International Assistance of more than US$

252. 5,000 are evaluated by a panel composed of the Chairperson

of the World Heritage Committee, or one vice-chairperson,

representatives of the World Heritage Centre Regional Desks

and the Advisory Bodies, meeting at least twice a year before

action by the Chairperson and Committee. Requests for the

approval of the Chairperson can be submitted at anytime to

the Secretariat and approved by the Chairperson after

appropriate evaluation.

The Chairperson is not authorized to approve requests

253. submitted by his own country. These will be examined by the

Committee.

All requests for the approval of the Committee should be

254. received by the Secretariat on or before These

1 February.

requests are submitted to the Committee at its next session.

VII.H Contractual Arrangements

Agreements are established between UNESCO and the

255. concerned State Party or its representative(s) for the

implementation of the approved International Assistance

requests in conformity with UNESCO regulations, following

66 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

the work plan and budget breakdown described in the

originally approved request.

VII.I Evaluation and follow-up of International Assistance

The monitoring and evaluation of the implemention of the

256. International Assistance requests will take place within 3

months of the activities’ completion. The results of these

evaluations will be collated and maintained by the

Secretariat in collaboration with the Advisory Bodies and

examined by the Committee on a regular basis.

The Committee reviews the implementation, evaluation and

257. follow-up of International Assistance in order to evaluate the

International Assistance effectiveness and to redefine its

priorities. 67

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

VIII. THE WORLD HERITAGE EMBLEM

VIII.A Preamble

At its second session (Washington, 1978), the Committee

258. adopted the World Heritage Emblem which had been

designed by Mr. Michel Olyff. This Emblem symbolizes the

interdependence of cultural and natural properties: the

central square is a form created by man and the circle

represents nature, the two being intimately linked. The

Emblem is round, like the world, but at the same time it is a

symbol of protection. It symbolizes the signifies

Convention,

the adherence of States Parties to the and serves

Convention,

to identify properties inscribed in the World Heritage List. It

is associated with public knowledge about the Convention

and is the imprimatur of the credibility and

Convention's

prestige. Above all, it is a representation of the universal

values for which the stands.

Convention

The Committee decided that the Emblem proposed by the

259. artist could be used, in any colour or size, depending on the

use, the technical possibilities and considerations of an

artistic nature. The Emblem should always carry the text

"WORLD HERITAGE . PATRIMOINE MONDIAL". The

space occupied by "PATRIMONIO MUNDIAL" can be used

for its translation into the national language of the country

where the Emblem is to be used.

In order to ensure the Emblem benefits from as much

260. visibility as possible while preventing improper uses, the

Committee at its twenty-second session (Kyoto, 1998)

adopted "Guidelines and Principles for the Use of the World

Heritage Emblem" as set out in the following paragraphs.

Although there is no mention of the Emblem in the

261. its use has been promoted by the Committee to

Convention,

identify properties protected by the and inscribed

Convention

on the World Heritage List since its adoption in 1978.

The World Heritage Committee is responsible for

262. determining the use of the World Heritage Emblem and for

making policy prescriptions regarding how it may be used. Decision 26 COM 15

As requested by the Committee at its 26th session (Budapest,

263. 2002), the World Heritage Emblem, the “World Heritage”

name and its derivatives are currently being registered under

Article 6ter of the Paris Convention for the Protection of

Industrial Property and are therefore protected.

68 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

The Emblem also has fund-raising potential that can be used

264. to enhance the marketing value of products with which it is

associated. A balance is needed between the Emblem's use

to further the aims of the and optimize

Convention

knowledge of the worldwide and the need to

Convention

prevent its abuse for inaccurate, inappropriate, and

unauthorized commercial or other purposes.

The Guidelines and Principles for the Use of the Emblem

265. and modalities for quality control should not become an

obstacle to co-operation for promotional activities.

Authorities responsible for reviewing and deciding on uses

of the Emblem (see below) need parameters on which to

base their decisions.

VIII.B Applicability

The Guidelines and Principles proposed herein cover all

266. proposed uses of the Emblem by:

a. The World Heritage Centre;

b. The UNESCO Publishing Office and other UNESCO

offices;

c. Agencies or National Commissions, responsible for

implementing the in each State Party;

Convention

d. World Heritage properties;

e. Other contracting parties, especially those operating

for predominantly commercial purposes.

VIII.C Responsibilities of States Parties

States Parties to the should take all possible

267. Convention

measures to prevent the use of the Emblem in their

respective countries by any group or for any purpose not

explicitly recognized by the Committee. States Parties are

encouraged to make full use of national legislation

including Trade Mark Laws.

VIII.D Increasing proper uses of the World Heritage

Emblem

Properties inscribed on the World Heritage List should be

268. marked with the emblem jointly with the UNESCO logo,

which should, however, be placed in such a way that they

do not visually impair the property in question.

Production of plaques to commemorate the inscription of

properties on the World Heritage List

Once a property is inscribed on the World Heritage List, the

269. 69

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

State Party should place a plaque, whenever possible, to

commemorate this inscription. These plaques are designed

to inform the public of the country concerned and foreign

visitors that the property visited has a particular value which

has been recognized by the international community. In

other words, the property is exceptional, of interest not only

to one nation, but also to the whole world. However, these

plaques have an additional function which is to inform the

general public about the or at

World Heritage Convention

least about the World Heritage concept and the World

Heritage List.

The Committee has adopted the following Guidelines for

270. the production of these plaques:

a) the plaque should be so placed that it can easily be seen

by visitors, without disfiguring the property;

b) the World Heritage Emblem should appear on the plaque;

c) the text should mention the property's outstanding

universal value; in this regard it might be useful to give a

short description of the property's outstanding

characteristics. States Parties may, if they wish, use the

descriptions appearing in the various World Heritage

publications or in the World Heritage exhibit, and which

may be obtained from the Secretariat;

d) the text should make reference to the World Heritage

and particularly to the World Heritage List

Convention

and to the international recognition conferred by

inscription on this List (however, it is not necessary to

mention at which session of the Committee the property

was inscribed); it may be appropriate to produce the text

in several languages for properties which receive many

foreign visitors.

The Committee proposes the following text as an example:

271. "(Name of property) has been inscribed upon the World

Heritage List of the Convention concerning the Protection

Inscription on

of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage.

this List confirms the outstanding universal value of a

cultural or natural property which deserves protection for

the benefit of all humanity."

This text could be then followed by a brief description of

272. the property concerned.

Furthermore, the national authorities should encourage

273. World Heritage properties to make a broad use of the

70 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Emblem such as on their letterheads, brochures and staff

uniforms.

Third parties which have received the right to produce

274. communication products related to the World Heritage

and World Heritage properties must give the

Convention

Emblem proper visibility. They should avoid creating a

different Emblem or logo for that particular product.

VIII.E Principles on the use of the World Heritage Emblem

The responsible authorities are henceforth requested to use

275. the following principles in making decisions on the use of

the Emblem:

a) The Emblem should be utilized for all projects

substantially associated with the work of the

including, to the maximum extent

Convention,

technically and legally possible, those already

approved and adopted, in order to promote the

Convention.

b) A decision to approve use of the Emblem should be

linked strongly to the quality and content of the

product with which it is to be associated, not on the

volume of products to be marketed or the financial

return expected. The main criterion for approval

should be the educational, scientific, cultural, or

artistic value of the proposed product related to World

Heritage principles and values. Approval should not

routinely be granted to place the Emblem on products

that have no, or extremely little, educational value,

such as cups, T-shirts, pins, and other tourist

souvenirs. Exceptions to this policy will be considered

for special events, such as meetings of the Committee

and ceremonies at which plaques are unveiled.

c) Any decision with respect to authorizing the use of the

Emblem must be completely unambiguous and in

keeping with the explicit and implicit goals and values

of the World Heritage Convention.

d) Except when authorized in accordance with these

principles it is not legitimate for commercial entities

to use the Emblem directly on their own material to

show their support for World Heritage. The

Committee recognizes, however, that any individual,

organization, or company is free to publish or produce

whatever they consider to be appropriate regarding

World Heritage properties, but official authorization to

do so under the World Heritage Emblem remains the

exclusive prerogative of the Committee, to be 71

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

exercised as prescribed in these Guidelines and

Principles.

e) Use of the Emblem by other contracting parties should

normally only be authorized when the proposed use

deals directly with World Heritage properties. Such

uses may be granted after approval by the national

authorities of the countries concerned.

f) In cases where no specific World Heritage properties

are involved or are not the principal focus of the

proposed use, such as general seminars and/or

workshops on scientific issues or conservation

techniques, use may be granted only upon express

approval in accordance with these Guidelines and

Principles. Requests for such uses should specifically

document the manner in which the proposed use is

expected to enhance the work of the Convention.

g) Permission to use the Emblem should not be granted

to travel agencies, airlines, or to any other type of

business operating for predominantly commercial

purposes, except under exceptional circumstances and

when manifest benefit to the World Heritage generally

or particular World Heritage properties can be

demonstrated. Requests for such use should require

approval in accordance with these Guidelines and

Principles and the concurrence of the national

authorities of countries specifically concerned.

The Secretariat is not to accept any advertising, travel,

or other promotional considerations from travel

agencies or other, similar companies in exchange or in

lieu of financial remuneration for use of the Emblem.

h) When commercial benefits are anticipated, the

Secretariat should ensure that the World Heritage

Fund receives a fair share of the revenues and

conclude a contract or other agreement that documents

the nature of the understandings that govern the

project and the arrangements for provision of income

to the Fund. In all cases of commercial use, any staff

time and related costs for personnel assigned by the

Secretariat or other reviewers, as appropriate, to any

initiative, beyond the nominal, must be fully covered

by the party requesting authorization to use the

Emblem.

National authorities are also called upon to ensure that

their properties or the World Heritage Fund receive a

fair share of the revenues and to document the nature

of the understandings that govern the project and the

72 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

distribution of any proceeds. "Directives concerning

UNESCO's co-operation with

i) If sponsors are sought for manufacturing products private extra-budgetary

funding sources" (Annex to

whose distribution the Secretariat considers necessary, the Decision 149 EX/Dec. 7.5)

the choice of partner or partners should be consistent, and "Guidelines for

at a minimum, with the criteria set forth in the mobilizing private funds and

criteria for selecting potential

"Directives concerning UNESCO's co-operation with partners" (Annex to the

private extra-budgetary funding sources" and Decision 156 EX/Dec. 9.4)

"Guidelines for mobilizing private funds and criteria

for selecting potential partners" and with such further

fund-raising guidance as the Committee may

prescribe. The necessity for such products should be

clarified and justified in written presentations that will

require approval in such manner as the Committee

may prescribe.

VIII.F Authorization procedure for the use of the World

Heritage Emblem

Simple agreement of the national authorities

National authorities may grant the use of the Emblem to a

276. national entity, provided that the project, whether national

or international, involves only World Heritage properties

located on the same national territory. National authorities’

decision should be guided by the Guidelines and Principles. Circular letter dated 14 April

States Parties are invited to provide the Secretariat with the

277. 1999

names and addresses of the authorities in charge of http://whc.unesco.org/circs/circ

managing the use of the Emblem. 99-4e.pdf

Agreement requiring quality control of content

Any other request for authorization to use the Emblem

278. should adopt the following procedure:

a) A request indicating the objective of the use of the

Emblem, its duration and territorial validity, should

be addressed to the Director of the World Heritage

Centre.

b) The Director of the World Heritage Centre has the

authority to grant the use of the Emblem in

accordance with the Guidelines and Principles. For

cases not covered, or not sufficiently covered, by the

Guidelines and Principles, the Director refers the

matter to the Chairperson who, in the most difficult

cases, might wish to refer the matter to the

Committee for final decision. A yearly report on the

authorized uses of the Emblem will be submitted to

the World Heritage Committee. 73

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

c) Authorization to use the Emblem in major products

to be widely distributed over an undetermined

period of time is conditional upon obtaining the

manufacturer’s commitment to consult with

countries concerned and secure their endorsement of

texts and images illustrating properties situated in

their territory, at no cost to the Secretariat, together

with the proof that this has been done. The text to be

approved should be provided in either one of the

official languages of the Committee or in the

language of the country concerned. A draft model to

be used by States Parties to authorize the use of the

Emblem to third parties appears below.

Content Approval Form: officially identified as

[Name of responsible national body],

the body responsible for approving the content of the texts and

photos relating to the World Heritage properties located in the

territory of hereby confirms to

[name of country], [name of

that the text and the images that it has submitted

producer]

for the World Heritage property(ies) are

[name of properties]

[approved] [approved subject to the following changes

requested] [are not approved]

(delete whatever entry does not apply, and provide, as needed,

a corrected copy of the text or a signed list of corrections).

Notes:

It is recommended that the initials of the responsible national

official be affixed to each page of text.

The National Authorities are given one month from their

acknowledged receipt in which to authorize the content,

following which the producers may consider that the content

has been tacitly approved, unless the responsible National

Authorities request in writing a longer period.

Texts should be supplied to the National Authorities in one of

the two official languages of the Committee, or in the official

language (or in one of the official languages) of the country in

which the properties are located, at the convenience of both

parties.

d) After having examined the request and considered it

as acceptable, the Secretariat may establish an

agreement with the partner.

e) If the Director of the World Heritage Centre judges

that a proposed use of the Emblem is not acceptable,

the Secretariat informs the requesting party of the

decision in writing.

74 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

VIII.G Right of States Parties to exert quality control

Authorization to use the Emblem is inextricably linked to

279. the requirement that the national authorities may exert

quality control over the products with which it is associated.

a) The States Parties to the are the only parties

Convention

authorized to approve the content (images and text) of

any distributed product appearing under the World

Heritage Emblem with regard to the properties located

in their territories.

b) States Parties that protect the Emblem legally must

review these uses.

c) Other States Parties may elect to review proposed uses

or refer such proposals to the Secretariat. States Parties

are responsible for identifying an appropriate national

authority and for informing the Secretariat whether they

wish to review proposed uses or to identify uses that

are inappropriate. The Secretariat maintains a list of

responsible national authorities. 75

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

IX. INFORMATION SOURCES

IX.A Information archived by the Secretariat

The Secretariat maintains a database of all documents of the

280. World Heritage Committee and the General Assembly of

States Parties to the This database

World Heritage Convention.

is available at the following Web address:

http://whc.unesco.org/en/statutorydoc

The Secretariat ensures that copies of Tentative Lists, World

281. Heritage nominations, including copies of maps and relevant

information received from States Parties are archived in hard

copy and in electronic format where possible. The Secretariat

also arranges for the archiving of relevant information

relating to inscribed properties, including evaluations and

other documents developed by the Advisory Bodies, any

correspondence and reports received from States Parties

(including Reactive Monitoring and Periodic Reports) and

correspondence and material from the Secretariat and World

Heritage Committee.

Archived material will be kept in a form appropriate to long-

282. term storage. Provisions will be made for the storage of

paper copies and electronic copies, as relevant. Provision

will be made for copies to be provided to States Parties as

requested.

Nominations of those properties inscribed on the World

283. Heritage List by the Committee will be made available for

consultation. States Parties are urged to place a copy of the

nomination on their own Web addresses and inform the

Secretariat of this action. States Parties preparing

nominations may wish to use such information as guides for

identifying and elaborating nomination of properties within

their own territories.

Advisory Body evaluations for each nomination and the

284. decision of the Committee concerning each nomination are

available at the following Web address :

http://whc.unesco.org/en/advisorybodies

IX.B Specific Information for World Heritage Committee

members and other States Parties

The Secretariat maintains two electronic mailing lists: one for

285. Committee members (wh-committee@unesco.org) and one

for all States Parties (wh-states@unesco.org). States Parties

are requested to supply all appropriate email addresses for

the establishment of these lists. These electronic mailing

76 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

lists, which supplement but do not replace the traditional

means of notifying States Parties, allow the Secretariat to

communicate, in a timely manner, announcements about the

availability of documents, changes to meeting schedules, and

other issues relevant to Committee members and other States

Parties.

Circular letters to the States Parties are available at the

286. following Web address:

http://whc.unesco.org/en/circularletters

Another Web address, linked to the public Web address

through restricted access, is maintained by the Secretariat

and contains specific information targeted at Committee

members, other States Parties and Advisory Bodies. Decision 28 COM 9

The Secretariat maintains also a database of decisions of the

287. Committee and resolutions of the General Assembly of

States Parties. These are available at the following Web

addres: http://whc.unesco.org/en/decisions

IX.C. Information and publications available to the public

The Secretariat provides access to information labelled as

288. publicly available and copyright free on World Heritage

properties and other relevant matters, wherever possible.

Information on issues related to World Heritage is available

289. at the Secretariat’s Web address (http://whc.unesco.org), on

the Web addresses of the Advisory Bodies and in libraries.

A list of databases accessible on the web and links to

relevant web addresses can be found in the Bibliography.

The Secretariat produces a wide variety of World Heritage

290. publications, including the World Heritage List, the List of

World Heritage in Danger, Brief Descriptions of World

Heritage properties, World Heritage Papers series,

newsletters, brochures and information kits. In addition,

other information materials aimed specifically at experts and

the general public are also developed. The list of World

Heritage publications can be found in the Bibliography or at

the following Web address:

http://whc.unesco.org/en/publications.

These information materials are distributed to the public

directly or through the national and international networks

established by States Parties or by World Heritage partners. 77

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

ANNEXES 79

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Model Instrument of Ratification/Acceptance and Accession Annex 1

MODEL INSTRUMENT OF RATIFICATION / ACCEPTANCE

the Convention concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage

WHEREAS

was adopted on 16 November 1972 by the General Conference of UNESCO at its seventeenth

session; the Government of .................................................. having considered the

NOW THEREFORE

aforesaid hereby [ratifies the same and undertake faithfully to carry out

Convention, [accepts

the stipulations therein contained.

I have signed and sealed this instrument.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,

Done at ..............................this .....................day of ......................20....... .

(Seal) Signature of Head of State,

Prime Minister or

Minister of Foreign Affairs

• The model instrument of ratification / acceptance is available from the UNESCO World Heritage Centre

and at the following Web address: http://whc.unesco.org/en/modelratification

• The original signed version of the completed form should be sent, preferably with an official translation in

English or French, to: Director-General, UNESCO, 7 place de Fontenoy, 75352 Paris 07 SP, France 81

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Model Instrument of Ratification/Acceptance and Accession Annex 1

MODEL INSTRUMENT OF ACCESSION

the Convention concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural

WHEREAS

Heritage was adopted on 16 November 1972 by the General Conference of UNESCO at its

seventeenth session; the Government of .................................................. having considered

NOW THEREFORE

the aforesaid hereby accedes the same and undertake faithfully to carry out the

Convention,

stipulations therein contained.

I have signed and sealed this instrument.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,

Done at ..............................this .....................day of ......................20....... .

(Seal) Signature of Head of State,

Prime Minister or

Minister of Foreign Affairs

• The model instrument of accession is available from the UNESCO World Heritage Centre and at the

following Web address: http://whc.unesco.org/en/modelratification

• The original signed version of the completed form should be sent, preferably with an official translation in

English or French, to: Director-General, UNESCO, 7 place de Fontenoy, 75352 Paris 07 SP, France

82 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Tentative List Submission Format Annex 2

TENTATIVE LIST SUBMISSION FORMAT

STATE PARTY: DATE OF SUBMISSION:

Submission prepared by:

Name: E-mail:

Address: Fax:

Institution: Telephone:

NAME OF PROPERTY:

State, Province or Region:

Latitude and Longitude, or UTM coordinates:

DESCRIPTION:

Justification of Outstanding Universal Value:

(Preliminary identification of the values of the property which merit inscription on the World Heritage List)

[see Paragraph 77 of the

Criteria met Operational Guidelines]:

(Please tick the box corresponding to the proposed criteria and justify the use of each below)

(i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) (x) .

78- 95 of the

[see Paragraphs Operational Guidelines]:

Statements of authenticity and/or integrity

Comparison with other similar properties:

(The comparison should outline similarities with other properties on the World Heritage List or not, and the reasons that

make the property stand out)

• The Tentative List submission format is available from the UNESCO World Heritage Centre and at the

following Web address: http://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists

• Further guidance on the preparation of Tentative Lists can be found in Paragraphs 62-

67 of the Operational

Guidelines.

• An example of a completed Tentative List submission format can be found at the following Web address:

http://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists

• All Tentative Lists submitted by States Parties are available at the following Web address:

http://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists

• The original signed version of the completed Tentative List submission format should be sent in English or

French to: UNESCO World Heritage Centre, 7 place de Fontenoy, 75352 Paris 07 SP, France

• States Parties are encouraged to also submit this information in electronic format (diskette or CD-Rom) or by e-

mail to wh-tentativelists@unesco.org 83

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Guidelines on the inscription of specific types of properties on the

World Heritage List Annex 3

GUIDELINES ON THE INSCRIPTION OF SPECIFIC TYPES OF

1

PROPERTIES ON THE WORLD HERITAGE LIST

INTRODUCTION

1. This annex provides information on specific types of properties to guide States Parties in

preparing nominations of properties for inscription on the World Heritage List. The

following information constitutes guidelines that should be used in association with Chapter

II of the which contains the criteria for inscription of properties on

Operational Guidelines,

the World Heritage List.

2. The Committee has endorsed the findings of expert meetings on the subject of cultural

landscapes, towns, canals and routes (Part I, below).

3. The reports of other expert meetings requested by the World Heritage Committee, in the

framework of the Global Strategy for a representative, balanced and credible World Heritage

List, are referred to in Part II.

4. Part III lists various comparative and thematic studies prepared by the Advisory Bodies.

I. CULTURAL LANDSCAPES, TOWNS, CANALS AND ROUTES

5. The World Heritage Committee has identified and defined several specific types of cultural

and natural properties and has adopted specific guidelines to facilitate the evaluation of such

properties when nominated for inscription on the World Heritage List. To date, these cover

the following categories, although it is likely that others may be added in due course:

a) Cultural Landscapes;

b) Historic Towns and Town Centres;

c) Heritage Canals;

d) Heritage Routes.

2

CULTURAL LANDSCAPES

Definition

6. Cultural landscapes are cultural properties and represent the "combined works of nature and of

man" designated in Article 1 of the They are illustrative of the evolution of human

Convention.

society and settlement over time, under the influence of the physical constraints and/or

opportunities presented by their natural environment and of successive social, economic and

cultural forces, both external and internal.

1 The Committee may develop additional guidelines for other types of properties in future years.

2 This text was prepared by an Expert Group on Cultural Landscapes (La Petite Pierre, France, 24 - 26

October 1992) (see document The text was subsequently approved for

WHC-92/CONF.202/10/Add). session (Santa Fe

inclusion in the by the World Heritage Committee at its 16th

Operational Guidelines

1992) (see document WHC-92/CONF.002/12). 85

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World Heritage List Annex 3

7. They should be selected on the basis both of their outstanding universal value and of their

representativity in terms of a clearly defined geo-cultural region and also for their capacity to

illustrate the essential and distinct cultural elements of such regions.

8. The term "cultural landscape" embraces a diversity of manifestations of the interaction between

humankind and its natural environment.

9. Cultural landscapes often reflect specific techniques of sustainable land-use, considering the

characteristics and limits of the natural environment they are established in, and a specific

spiritual relation to nature. Protection of cultural landscapes can contribute to modern

techniques of sustainable land-use and can maintain or enhance natural values in the landscape.

The continued existence of traditional forms of land-use supports biological diversity in many

regions of the world. The protection of traditional cultural landscapes is therefore helpful in

maintaining biological diversity.

Definition and Categories

10. Cultural landscapes fall into three main categories, namely:

(i) The most easily identifiable is the clearly defined landscape designed and created

This embraces garden and parkland landscapes constructed for

intentionally by man.

aesthetic reasons which are often (but not always) associated with religious or other

monumental buildings and ensembles.

(ii) The second category is the This results from an initial

organically evolved landscape.

social, economic, administrative, and/or religious imperative and has developed its

present form by association with and in response to its natural environment. Such

landscapes reflect that process of evolution in their form and component features. They

fall into two sub-categories:

- a relict (or fossil) landscape is one in which an evolutionary process came to an

end at some time in the past, either abruptly or over a period. Its significant

distinguishing features are, however, still visible in material form.

- a continuing landscape is one which retains an active social role in

contemporary society closely associated with the traditional way of life, and in

which the evolutionary process is still in progress. At the same time it exhibits

significant material evidence of its evolution over time.

(iii) The final category is the The inscription

associative cultural landscape.

of such landscapes on the World Heritage List is justifiable by virtue of

the powerful religious, artistic or cultural associations of the natural

element rather than material cultural evidence, which may be insignificant

or even absent.

Inscription of Cultural Landscapes on the World Heritage List

11. The extent of a cultural landscape for inscription on the World Heritage List is relative to its

functionality and intelligibility. In any case, the sample selected must be substantial enough to

adequately represent the totality of the cultural landscape that it illustrates. The possibility of

designating long linear areas which represent culturally significant transport and communication

networks should not be excluded.

86 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Guidelines on the inscription of specific types of properties on the

World Heritage List Annex 3

12. General criteria for protection and management are equally applicable to cultural landscapes. It

is important that due attention be paid to the full range of values represented in the landscape,

both cultural and natural. The nominations should be prepared in collaboration with and the full

approval of local communities.

13. The existence of a category of "cultural landscape", included on the World Heritage List on

the basis of the criteria set out in Paragraph 77 of the does not

Operational Guidelines,

exclude the possibility of properties of exceptional importance in relation to both cultural

and natural criteria continuing to be inscribed (see definition of mixed properties as set out in

Paragraph 46). In such cases, their outstanding universal value must be justified under both

sets of criteria. 3

HISTORIC TOWNS AND TOWN CENTRES

Definition and Categories

14. Groups of urban buildings eligible for inscription on the World Heritage List fall into three main

categories, namely:

(i) towns which are but which provide unchanged archaeological

no longer inhabited

evidence of the past; these generally satisfy the criterion of authenticity and their state

of conservation can be relatively easily controlled;

(ii) and which, by their very nature, have

historic towns which are still inhabited

developed and will continue to develop under the influence of socio-economic and

cultural change, a situation that renders the assessment of their authenticity more

difficult and any conservation policy more problematical;

(iii) which paradoxically have something in common

new towns of the twentieth century

with both the aforementioned categories: while their original urban organization is

clearly recognizable and their authenticity is undeniable, their future is unclear because

their development is largely uncontrollable.

Inscription of Historic Towns and Town Centres on the World Heritage List

15. The significance of Historic Towns and Town Centres can be examined under the factors

outlined below:

(i) Towns no longer inhabited

The evaluation of towns that are no longer inhabited does not raise any special difficulties other

than those related to archaeological properties in general: the criteria which call for uniqueness

or exemplary character have led to the choice of groups of buildings noteworthy for their purity

of style, for the concentrations of monuments they contain and sometimes for their important

historical associations. It is important for urban archaeological sites to be listed as integral units.

A cluster of monuments or a small group of buildings is not adequate to suggest the multiple

and complex functions of a city which has disappeared; remains of such a city should be

preserved in their entirety together with their natural surroundings whenever possible.

3 This text was included in the January 1987 version of the following the

Operational Guidelines

discussion by the Committee at its 8th session (Buenos Aires, 1984) of the conclusions of the Meeting

of Experts to Consult on Historic Towns which met in Paris from 5 to 7 September 1984 organized by

ICOMOS. 87

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(ii) Inhabited historic towns

In the case of inhabited historic towns the difficulties are numerous, largely owing to the

fragility of their urban fabric (which has in many cases been seriously disrupted since the advent

of the industrial era) and the runaway speed with which their surroundings have been urbanized.

To qualify for inscription, towns should compel recognition because of their architectural

interest and should not be considered only on the intellectual grounds of the role they may have

played in the past or their value as historical symbols under criterion (vi) for the inscription of

cultural properties on the World Heritage List (see Paragraph 77 (vi) of the Operational

To be eligible for inscription in the List, the spatial organization, structure,

Guidelines).

materials, forms and, where possible, functions of a group of buildings should essentially reflect

the civilization or succession of civilizations which have prompted the nomination of the

property. Four categories can be distinguished:

a) Towns which are typical of a specific period or culture, which have been almost

wholly preserved and which have remained largely unaffected by subsequent

developments. Here the property to be listed is the entire town together with its

surroundings, which must also be protected;

b) Towns that have evolved along characteristic lines and have preserved, sometimes

in the midst of exceptional natural surroundings, spatial arrangements and

structures that are typical of the successive stages in their history. Here the clearly

defined historic part takes precedence over the contemporary environment;

c) "Historic centres" that cover exactly the same area as ancient towns and are now

enclosed within modern cities. Here it is necessary to determine the precise limits

of the property in its widest historical dimensions and to make appropriate

provision for its immediate surroundings;

d) Sectors, areas or isolated units which, even in the residual state in which they have

survived, provide coherent evidence of the character of a historic town which has

disappeared. In such cases surviving areas and buildings should bear sufficient

testimony to the former whole.

Historic centres and historic areas should be listed only where they contain a large number of

ancient buildings of monumental importance which provide a direct indication of the

characteristic features of a town of exceptional interest. Nominations of several isolated and

unrelated buildings which allegedly represent, in themselves, a town whose urban fabric has

ceased to be discernible, should not be encouraged.

However, nominations could be made regarding properties that occupy a limited space but have

had a major influence on the history of town planning. In such cases, the nomination should

make it clear that it is the monumental group that is to be listed and that the town is mentioned

only incidentally as the place where the property is located. Similarly, if a building of clearly

outstanding universal value is located in severely degraded or insufficiently representative urban

surroundings, it should, of course, be listed without any special reference to the town.

(iii) New towns of the twentieth century

It is difficult to assess the quality of new towns of the twentieth century. History alone will tell

which of them will best serve as examples of contemporary town planning. The examination of

the files on these towns should be deferred, save under exceptional circumstances.

Under present conditions, preference should be given to the inscription in the World Heritage

List of small or medium-sized urban areas which are in a position to manage any potential

88 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

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World Heritage List Annex 3

growth, rather than the great metropolises, on which sufficiently complete information and

documentation cannot readily be provided that would serve as a satisfactory basis for their

inscription in their entirety.

In view of the effects which the inscription of a town on the World Heritage List could have on

its future, such entries should be exceptional. Inscription in the List implies that legislative and

administrative measures have already been taken to ensure the protection of the group of

buildings and its environment. Informed awareness on the part of the population concerned,

without whose active participation any conservation scheme would be impractical, is also

essential.

HERITAGE CANALS

16. The concept of "canals" is discussed in detail in the Report of the Expert Meeting on

4

Heritage Canals (Canada, September 1994) .

Definition

17. A canal is a human-engineered waterway. It may be of outstanding universal value from the

point of view of history or technology, either intrinsically or as an exceptional example

representative of this category of cultural property. The canal may be a monumental work,

the defining feature of a linear cultural landscape, or an integral component of a complex

cultural landscape.

Inscription of Heritage Canals on the World Heritage List

18. Authenticity depends holistically upon values and the relationships between these values.

One distinctive feature of the canal as a heritage element is its evolution over time. This is

linked to how it was used during different periods and the associated technological changes

the canal underwent. The extent of these changes may constitute a heritage element.

19. The authenticity and historical interpretation of a canal encompass the connection between

the real property (subject of the possible movable property (boats, temporary

Convention),

navigation items) and the associated structures (bridges, etc) and landscape.

20. The significance of canals can be examined under technological, economic, social, and

landscape factors as outlined below:

(i) Technology

Canals can serve a variety of purposes: irrigation, navigation, defence, water-power, flood

mitigation, land-drainage and water-supply. The following are areas of technology which

may be of significance:

a) The lining and waterproofing of the water channel;

b) The engineering structures of the line with reference to comparative structural

features in other areas of architecture and technology;

c) The development of the sophistication of construction methods; and

d) The transfer of technologies.

4 Expert meeting on "Heritage Canals" (Canada, 15-19 September 1994) (see document WHC-

discussed by the World Heritage Committee at its 19th session (Berlin,

94/CONF.003/INF.10)

Germany, 1995) (see document WHC-95/CONF.203/16). 89

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(ii) Economy

Canals contribute to the economy in a variety of ways, e.g. in terms of economic

development and the conveyance of goods and people. Canals were the first man-made

routes for the effective carriage of bulk cargoes. Canals played and continue to play a key

role in economic development through their use for irrigation. The following factors are

important:

a) Nation building;

b) Agricultural development;

c) Industrial development;

d) Generation of wealth;

e) Development of engineering skills applied to other areas and industries;

and

f) Tourism.

(iii) Social Factors

The building of canals had, and their operation continues to have, social consequences:

a) The redistribution of wealth with social and cultural results; and

b) The movement of people and the interaction of cultural groups.

(iv) Landscape

Such large-scale engineering works had and continue to have an impact on the natural

landscape. Related industrial activity and changing settlement patterns cause visible changes

to landscape forms and patterns.

HERITAGE ROUTES

21. The concept of "routes" or cultural itineraries was discussed by the expert meeting on

"Routes as a Part of our Cultural Heritage" (Madrid, Spain, November 1994) .

5

Definition

22. The concept of heritage routes is shown to be a rich and fertile one, offering a privileged

framework in which mutual understanding, a plural approach to history and a culture of

peace can all operate.

23. A heritage route is composed of tangible elements of which the cultural significance comes

from exchanges and a multi-dimensional dialogue across countries or regions, and that

illustrate the interaction of movement, along the route, in space and time.

5 Expert Meeting on "Routes as part of Our Cultural Heritage" (Madrid, 24-25 November 1994) (see

document discussed by the World Heritage Committee at its 19th session

WHC-94/CONF.003/INF.13)

(Berlin, 1995) (see document WHC-95/CONF.203/16).

90 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

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World Heritage List Annex 3

Inscription of Heritage Routes on the World Heritage List

24. The following points should be considered when determining whether a heritage route is

suitable for inscription on the World Heritage List:

(i) The requirement to hold outstanding universal value should be recalled.

(ii) The concept of heritage routes:

- is based on the dynamics of movement and the idea of with

exchanges,

in space and time;

continuity

- refers to a where the route has a worth over and above the sum of the

whole,

elements making it up and through which it gains its cultural significance;

- highlights exchange and dialogue between countries or between regions;

- is with different aspects developing and adding to its

multi-dimensional,

prime purpose which may be religious, commercial, administrative or

otherwise.

(iii) A heritage route may be considered as a specific, dynamic type of cultural

landscape, just as recent debates have led to their acceptance within the Operational

Guidelines.

(iv) The identification of a heritage route is based on a collection of strengths and

tangible elements, testimony to the significance of the route itself.

(v) The conditions of authenticity are to be applied on the grounds of its significance

and other elements making up the heritage route. It will take into account the

duration of the route, and perhaps how often it is used nowadays, as well as the

legitimate wishes for development of peoples affected.

These points will be considered within the natural framework of the route and its

intangible and symbolic dimensions.

II. REPORTS OF REGIONAL AND THEMATIC EXPERT MEETINGS

25. The World Heritage Committee, in the framework of the Global Strategy for a

representative, balanced and credible World Heritage List has requested a number of

regional and thematic expert meetings on different types of properties. The results of these

meetings may guide States Parties in preparing nominations. The reports of the expert

meetings presented to the World Heritage Committee are available at the following Web

address: http://whc.unesco.org/en/globalstrategy

III. THEMATIC AND COMPARATIVE STUDIES BY THE ADVISORY BODIES

26. To fulfil their obligations concerning evaluations of nominations of cultural and natural

properties, the Advisory Bodies have undertaken comparative and thematic studies, often

with partner organizations, in different subject areas in order to provide a context for their

evaluations.

These reports, most of which are available on their respective Web addresses, include:

Earth's Geological History - A Contextual Framework for Assessment of World Heritage Fossil

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Guidelines on the inscription of specific types of properties on the

World Heritage List Annex 3

Site Nominations (September 1996)

International Canal Monuments List (1996)

http://www.icomos.org/studies/canals-toc.htm

World Heritage Bridges (1996)

http://www.icomos.org/studies/bridges.htm

A Global Overview of Forest Protected Areas on the World Heritage List (September 1997)

http://www.unep-wcmc.org/wh/reviews/forests/

A Global Overview of Wetland and Marine Protected Areas on the World Heritage List

(September 1997)

http://www.unep-wcmc.org/wh/reviews/wetlands/

Human Use of World Heritage Natural Sites (September 1997)

http://www.unep-wcmc.org/wh/reviews/human/

Fossil Hominid Sites (1997)

http://www.icomos.org/studies/hominid.htm

The Urban Architectural Heritage of Latin America (1998)

http://www.icomos.org/studies/latin-towns.htm

Les Théâtres et les Amphithéâtres antiques (1999)

http://www.icomos.org/studies/theatres.htm

Railways as World Heritage Sites (1999)

http://www.icomos.org/studies/railways.htm

A Global Overview of Protected Areas on the World Heritage List of Particular

Importance for Biodiversity (November 2000)

http://www.unep-wcmc.org/wh/reviews/

Les villages ouvriers comme éléments du patrimoine de l'industrie (2001)

http://www.icomos.org/studies/villages-ouvriers.htm

A Global Strategy for Geological World Heritage (February 2002)

Rock-Art Sites of Southern Africa (2002)

http://www.icomos.org/studies/sarockart.htm

92 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Authenticity in relation to the World Heritage Convention Annex 4

AUTHENTICITY IN RELATION

TO THE WORLD HERITAGE CONVENTION

INTRODUCTION

This Annex reproduces the Nara Document on Authenticity, drafted by the 45 participants to the

Nara Conference on Authenticity in Relation to the held at Nara,

World Heritage Convention,

Japan, from 1-6 November 1994. The Nara Conference was organized in co-operation with

UNESCO, ICCROM and ICOMOS.

The World Heritage Committee examined the report of the Nara meeting on Authenticity at its

18th session (Phuket, Thailand, 1994) (see document WHC-94/CONF.003/16).

Subsequent expert meetings have enriched the concept of authenticity in relation to the World

(see Bibliography of the

Heritage Convention Operational Guidelines).

I. THE NARA DOCUMENT ON AUTHENTICITY

Preamble

1. We, the experts assembled in Nara (Japan), wish to acknowledge the generous spirit and

intellectual courage of the Japanese authorities in providing a timely forum in which we could

challenge conventional thinking in the conservation field, and debate ways and means of

broadening our horizons to bring greater respect for cultural and heritage diversity to

conservation practice.

2. We also wish to acknowledge the value of the framework for discussion provided by the World

Heritage Committee's desire to apply the test of authenticity in ways which accord full respect to the

social and cultural values of all societies, in examining the outstanding universal value of cultural

properties proposed for the World Heritage List.

3. The Nara Document on Authenticity is conceived in the spirit of the Charter of Venice, 1964, and

builds on it and extends it in response to the expanding scope of cultural heritage concerns and

interests in our contemporary world.

4. In a world that is increasingly subject to the forces of globalization and homogenization, and in a

world in which the search for cultural identity is sometimes pursued through aggressive

nationalism and the suppression of the cultures of minorities, the essential contribution made by

the consideration of authenticity in conservation practice is to clarify and illuminate the

collective memory of humanity.

Cultural Diversity and Heritage Diversity

5. The diversity of cultures and heritage in our world is an irreplaceable source of spiritual and

intellectual richness for all humankind. The protection and enhancement of cultural and heritage

diversity in our world should be actively promoted as an essential aspect of human development.

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Authenticity in relation to the World Heritage Convention Annex 4

6. Cultural heritage diversity exists in time and space, and demands respect for other cultures and

all aspects of their belief systems. In cases where cultural values appear to be in conflict, respect

for cultural diversity demands acknowledgment of the legitimacy of the cultural values of all

parties.

7. All cultures and societies are rooted in the particular forms and means of tangible and intangible

expression which constitute their heritage, and these should be respected.

8. It is important to underline a fundamental principle of UNESCO, to the effect that the cultural

heritage of each is the cultural heritage of all. Responsibility for cultural heritage and the

management of it belongs, in the first place, to the cultural community that has generated it, and

subsequently to that which cares for it. However, in addition to these responsibilities, adherence

to the international charters and conventions developed for conservation of cultural heritage also

obliges consideration of the principles and responsibilities flowing from them. Balancing their

own requirements with those of other cultural communities is, for each community, highly

desirable, provided achieving this balance does not undermine their fundamental cultural values.

Values and authenticity

9. Conservation of cultural heritage in all its forms and historical periods is rooted in the values

attributed to the heritage. Our ability to understand these values depends, in part, on the degree

to which information sources about these values may be understood as credible or truthful.

Knowledge and understanding of these sources of information, in relation to original and

subsequent characteristics of the cultural heritage, and their meaning, is a requisite basis for

assessing all aspects of authenticity.

10. Authenticity, considered in this way and affirmed in the Charter of Venice, appears as the

essential qualifying factor concerning values. The understanding of authenticity plays a

fundamental role in all scientific studies of the cultural heritage, in conservation and restoration

planning, as well as within the inscription procedures used for the World Heritage Convention

and other cultural heritage inventories.

11. All judgements about values attributed to cultural properties as well as the credibility of related

information sources may differ from culture to culture, and even within the same culture. It is

thus not possible to base judgements of values and authenticity within fixed criteria. On the

contrary, the respect due to all cultures requires that heritage properties must be considered and

judged within the cultural contexts to which they belong.

12. Therefore, it is of the highest importance and urgency that, within each culture, recognition be

accorded to the specific nature of its heritage values and the credibility and truthfulness of

related information sources.

13. Depending on the nature of the cultural heritage, its cultural context, and its evolution through

time, authenticity judgements may be linked to the worth of a great variety of sources of

information. Aspects of the sources may include form and design, materials and substance, use

and function, traditions and techniques, location and setting, and spirit and feeling, and other

internal and external factors. The use of these sources permits elaboration of the specific artistic,

historic, social, and scientific dimensions of the cultural heritage being examined.

94 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Authenticity in relation to the World Heritage Convention Annex 4

Appendix 1: Suggestions for follow-up (proposed by Herb Stovel)

1. Respect for cultural and heritage diversity requires conscious efforts to avoid imposing mechanistic

formulae or standardized procedures in attempting to define or determine authenticity of particular

monuments and sites.

2. Efforts to determine authenticity in a manner respectful of cultures and heritage diversity requires

approaches which encourage cultures to develop analytical processes and tools specific to their nature and

needs. Such approaches may have several aspects in common:

- efforts to ensure assessment of authenticity involve multidisciplinary collaboration and the

appropriate utilisation of all available expertise and knowledge;

- efforts to ensure attributed values are truly representative of a culture and the diversity of its

interests, in particular monuments and sites;

- efforts to document clearly the particular nature of authenticity for monuments and sites as a

practical guide to future treatment and monitoring;

- efforts to update authenticity assessments in light of changing values and circumstances.

3. Particularly important are efforts to ensure that attributed values are respected, and that their

determination included efforts to build, as far as possible, a multidisciplinary and community

consensus concerning these values.

4. Approaches should also build on and facilitate international co-operation among all those with

an interest in conservation of cultural heritage, in order to improve global respect and

understanding for the diverse expressions and values of each culture.

5. Continuation and extension of this dialogue to the various regions and cultures of the world is a

prerequisite to increasing the practical value of consideration of authenticity in the conservation

of the common heritage of humankind.

6. Increasing awareness within the public of this fundamental dimension of heritage is an absolute

necessity in order to arrive at concrete measures for safeguarding the vestiges of the past. This

means developing greater understanding of the values represented by the cultural properties

themselves, as well as respecting the role such monuments and sites play in contemporary

society.

Appendix 2: Definitions

Conservation: all efforts designed to understand cultural heritage, know its history and meaning,

ensure its material safeguard and, as required, its presentation, restoration and enhancement. (Cultural

heritage is understood to include monuments, groups of buildings and sites of cultural value as defined

in Article 1 of the World Heritage Convention).

Information sources: all material, written, oral and figurative sources which make it possible to know

the nature, specifications, meaning and history of the cultural heritage.

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II. CHRONOLOGICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY - ON AUTHENTICITY

Publications which preceded the Nara meeting and which helped prepare the ground for the

authenticity discussion which took place in Nara:

Larsen, Knut Einar, A note on the authenticity of historic timber buildings with particular reference to

Occasional Papers for the World Heritage Convention, ICOMOS, December 1992.

Japan,

Larsen, Knut Einar, Authenticity and Reconstruction: Architectural Preservation in Japan,

Norwegian Institute of Technology, Vols. 1-2, 1993.

Preparatory meeting for the Nara Meeting, held in Bergen, Norway, 31 January - 1 February 1994:

Larsen, Knut Einar and Marstein, Nils (ed.), Conference on authenticity in relation to the World

Bergen, Norway, 31 January - 2 February 1994, Tapir

Heritage Convention Preparatory workshop,

Forlag, Trondheim 1994.

The Nara meeting, 1-6 November 1994, Nara, Japan:

Larsen, Knut Einar with an editorial group (Jokilehto, Lemaire, Masuda, Marstein, Stovel), Nara

conference on authenticity in relation to the World Heritage Convention. Conférence de Nara sur

Nara, Japan, 1-6 November

l'authenticité dans le cadre de la Convention du Patrimoine Mondial.

1994, Proceedings published by UNESCO - World Heritage Centre, Agency for Cultural Affairs of

Japan, ICCROM and ICOMOS, 1994.

The Nara meeting brought together 45 experts from 26 countries and international

organizations from around the world. Their papers are contained in the volume cited above,

as is the Nara document prepared in a working group of 12 meeting participants and edited by

Raymond Lemaire and Herb Stovel. This volume of Proceedings invites members of

ICOMOS and others to extend the discussions of the Nara Document issues to other regions

of the world.

Significant post-Nara regional meetings (as of January 2005):

Cesky Krumlov, Czech Republic, ICOMOS

Authenticity and Monitoring, October 17-22, 1995,

European Conference, 1995.

The European ICOMOS Conference of 17-22 October, 1995 which took place in Cesky

Krumlov, Czech Republic brought together 18 European members of ICOMOS to present

national views of the application of authenticity concepts from 14 countries. A synthesis of

presentations affirmed the importance of authenticity within the analytical processes we

apply to conservation problems as a means of assuring truthful, sincere and honest

approaches to conservation problems, and gave emphasis to strengthening the notion of

dynamic conservation in order to apply authenticity analysis appropriately to cultural

landscapes and urban settings.

Interamerican symposium on authenticity in the conservation and management of the cultural

US/ICOMOS, The Getty Conservation Institute, San Antonio, Texas 1996.

heritage,

This Authenticity meeting which took place in San Antonio, Texas, USA in March 1996,

brought together participants from ICOMOS national committees of North, Central and South

America to debate the application of the concepts of Nara. The meeting adopted the

96 Operational Guidelines for the implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Authenticity in relation to the World Heritage Convention Annex 4

which discussed the relationship between authenticity and

Declaration of San Antonio,

identity, history, materials, social value, dynamic and static sites, stewardship and economics,

and contained recommendations extending “proofs” of authenticity to include reflection of its

as well as recommendations pertinent

true value, integrity, context, identity, use and function,

to different typologies of sites.

Saouma-Forero, Galia, (edited by), Authenticity and integrity in an African context: expert meeting,

Zimbabwe, 26-29 May 2000, UNESCO - World Heritage Centre, Paris 2001.

Great Zimbabwe,

The Great Zimbabwe meeting organised by the World Heritage Centre (26-29 May 2000)

focused attention on both authenticity and integrity in an African context. Eighteen speakers

looked at issues arising in management of both cultural and natural heritage properties. The

meeting resulted in the publication cited above, which includes a set of recommendations

coming from meeting participants. Among recommendations were suggestions to include

among attributes

management systems, language, and other forms of intangible heritage

expressing authenticity, and an emphasis given to the place of local communities in the

sustainable heritage management process.

Reconstruction discussions in the context of the (as of January 2005):

World Heritage Convention

The Riga Charter on authenticity and historical reconstruction in relationship to cultural heritage

Riga, 24 October 2000, Latvian National Commission for UNESCO

adopted by regional conference,

- World Heritage Centre, ICCROM.

Incerti Medici, Elena and Stovel, Herb, Authenticity and historical reconstruction in relationship with

UNESCO

cultural heritage, regional conference, Riga, Latvia, October 23-24 2000: summary report,

- World Heritage Centre, Paris, ICCROM, Rome 2001.

Stovel, Herb, The Riga Charter on authenticity and historical reconstruction in relationship to

in

cultural heritage, Riga, Latvia, October 2000, Conservation and management of archaeological

Vol. 4, n. 4, 2001.

sites, Tallinn, 16-18 May 2002,

Alternatives to historical reconstruction in the World Heritage Cities,

Tallinn Cultural Heritage Department, Estonia National Commission for UNESCO, Estonia National

Heritage Board. 97

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Format for the nomination of properties for inscription

on the World Heritage List Annex 5

FORMAT FOR THE NOMINATION OF PROPERTIES FOR INSCRIPTION ON THE

WORLD HERITAGE LIST

This Format must be used for all nominations

submitted after 2 February 2005

• The Nomination Format is available at the following Web address: http://whc.unesco.org/en/nominationform

• Further guidance on the preparation of nominations can be found in Section III of the Operational Guidelines

• The original signed version of the completed Nomination Format should be sent in English or French to

UNESCO World Heritage Centre

7, place de Fontenoy

75352 Paris 07 SP

France

Telephone: +33 (0) 1 4568 1571

Fax: +33 (0) 1 4568 5570

E-mail: wh-nominations@unesco.org 99

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Format for the nomination of properties for inscription

on the World Heritage List Annex 5

Executive Summary

This information, to be provided by the State Party, will be updated by the Secretariat

following the decision by the World Heritage Committee. It will then be returned to the

State Party confirming the basis on which the property is inscribed on the World Heritage

List.

State Party

State, Province or Region

Name of Property

Geographical coordinates to the nearest second

Textual description of the boundary(ies) of the

nominated property

A4 (or "letter") size map of the nominated Attach A4 (or "letter") size map

property, showing boundaries and buffer zone

(if present)

Justification

Statement of Outstanding Universal Value

(text should clarify what is considered to be the

outstanding universal value embodied by the

nominated property)

Criteria under which property is nominated

(itemize criteria)

77 of the

(see Paragraph Operational Guidelines) Organization:

Name and contact information of official local Address:

institution/agency Tel:

Fax:

E-mail:

Web address:

100 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Format for the nomination of properties for inscription

on the World Heritage List Annex 5

Properties for inscription on the World Heritage List

Note: In preparing the nomination, States Parties should use this format but delete the explanatory notes.

NOMINATION FORMAT EXPLANATORY NOTES

Together with Section 2, this is the most

1. Identification of the Property important section in the nomination. It must make

clear to the Committee precisely where the

property is located and how it is geographically

defined. In the case of serial nominations, insert a

table that shows the name of the component part,

region (if different for different components),

coordinates, area and buffer zone. Other fields

could also be added (page reference or map

number, etc.) that differentiate the several

components.

1.a Country (and State Party if different)

1.b State, Province or Region This is the official name of the property that will

1.c Name of Property appear in published material about World

Heritage. It should be concise. Do not exceed 200

characters, including spaces and punctuation.

In the case of serial nominations (see Paragraphs

137-

140 of the give a

Operational Guidelines),

name for the (e.g.,

ensemble Baroque Churches

Do not include the name of the

of the Philippines).

components of a serial nomination, which should

be included in a table as part of 1.d and 1.f.

In this space provide the latitude and longitude

1.d Geographical coordinates to the nearest coordinates (to the nearest second) or UTM

second coordinates (to the nearest 10 metres) of a point at

the approximate centre of the nominated property.

Do not use other coordinate systems. If in doubt,

please consult the Secretariat.

In the case of serial nominations, provide a table

showing the name of each property, its region (or

nearest town as appropriate), and the coordinates

of its centre point. Coordinate format examples:

N 45° 06' 05" W 15° 37' 5

6" or

5

UTM Zone 18 Easting: 45670

45

86750

Northing: 101

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Format for the nomination of properties for inscription

on the World Heritage List Annex 5

NOMINATION FORMAT EXPLANATORY NOTES

Annex to the nomination, and list below with

1.e Maps and plans, showing the boundaries scales and dates:

of the nominated property and buffer

zone (i) An original copy of a topographic map

showing the property nominated, at the largest

scale available which shows the entire property.

The boundaries of the nominated property and

buffer zone should be clearly marked. Either on

this map, or an accompanying one, there should

also be a record of the boundaries of zones of

special legal protection from which the property

benefits. Multiple maps may be necessary for

serial nominations.

Maps may be obtained from the addresses shown

at the following Web address

http://whc.unesco.org/en/mapagencies

If topographic maps are not available at the

appropriate scale, other maps may be substituted.

All maps should be capable of being geo-

referenced, with a minimum of three points on

opposite sides of the maps with complete sets of

coordinates. The maps, untrimmed, should show

scale, orientation, projection, datum, property

name and date. If possible, maps should be sent

rolled and not folded.

Geographic Information in digital form is

encouraged if possible, suitable for incorporation

into a GIS (Geographic Information System). In

this case the delineation of the boundaries

(nominated property and buffer zone) should be

presented in vector form, prepared at the largest

scale possible. The State Party is invited to

contact the Secretariat for further information

concerning this option.

(ii) A Location Map showing the location

of the property within the State Party,

(iii) Plans and specially prepared maps of

the property showing individual features are

helpful and may also be annexed.

To facilitate copying and presentation to the

Advisory Bodies and the World Heritage

Committee A4 (or “letter”) size reduction and a

digital image file of the principal maps should be

included in the nomination text if possible.

Where no buffer zone is proposed, the nomination

must include a statement as to why a buffer zone

is not required for the proper conservation of the

nominated property.

102 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Format for the nomination of properties for inscription

on the World Heritage List Annex 5

NOMINATION FORMAT EXPLANATORY NOTES

In the case of (see Paragraphs

serial nominations

1.f Area of nominated property (ha.) and 137-

140 of the insert a

Operational Guidelines),

proposed buffer zone (ha.) table that shows the name of the component part,

region (if different for different components),

Area of nominated property: ________ ha coordinates, area and buffer zone.

The serial nomination table should also be used to

Buffer zone ________ ha show the size of the separate nominated areas and

of the buffer zone(s).

Total ________ ha

2. Description This section should begin with a description of the

2.a Description of Property nominated property at the date of nomination. It

should refer to all the significant features of the

property.

In the case of a cultural property this section will

include a description of whatever elements make

the property culturally significant. It could include

a description of any building or buildings and

their architectural style, date of construction,

materials, etc. This section should also describe

important aspects of the setting such as gardens,

parks etc. For a rock art site, for example, the

description should refer to the rock art as well as

the surrounding landscapes. In the case of an

historic town or district, it is not necessary to

describe each individual building, but important

public buildings should be described individually

and an account should be given of the planning or

layout of the area, its street pattern and so on.

In the case of a natural property the account

should deal with important physical attributes,

geology, habitats, species and population size, and

other significant ecological features and

processes. Species lists should be provided where

practicable, and the presence of threatened or

endemic taxa should be highlighted. The extent

and methods of exploitation of natural resources

should be described.

In the case of cultural landscapes, it will be

necessary to produce a description under all the

matters mentioned above. Special attention should

be paid to the interaction of man and nature.

The entire nominated property identified in

section 1 (Identification of the Property) should be

described. In the case of serial nominations (see

137-

140 of the

Paragraphs Operational

each of the component parts should

Guidelines),

be separately described.

Describe how the property has reached its present

2.b History and Development form and condition and the significant changes

that it has undergone, including recent

conservation history. 103

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Format for the nomination of properties for inscription

on the World Heritage List Annex 5

NOMINATION FORMAT EXPLANATORY NOTES

This should include some account of construction

phases in the case of monuments, sites, buildings

or groups of buildings. Where there have been

major changes, demolitions or rebuilding since

completion they should also be described.

In the case of a natural property, the account

should cover significant events in history or pre-

history that have affected the evolution of the

property and give an account of its interaction

with humankind. This will include changes in the

use of the property and its natural resources for

hunting, fishing or agriculture, or changes brought

about by climatic change, floods, earthquake or

other natural causes.

Such information will also be required in the case

of cultural landscapes, where all aspects of the

history of human activity in the area needs to be

covered.

This section must make clear why the property is

3. Justification for Inscription considered to be of "outstanding universal value".

The whole of this section of the nomination

should be written with careful reference to the

criteria for inscription found in Paragraph 75 of

the It should not include

Operational Guidelines.

detailed descriptive material about the property or

its management, which are addressed in other

sections, but should concentrate on why the

property is important.

3.a Criteria under which inscription is See Paragraph 77 of the Operational Guidelines.

proposed (and justification for inscription Provide a separate justification for each criterion

under these criteria) cited.

State briefly how the property meets those criteria

under which it has been nominated (where

necessary, make reference to the "description" and

"comparative analysis" sections below, but do not

duplicate the text of these sections.).

Based on the criteria used above, the proposed

3.b Proposed Statement of Outstanding Statement of Outstanding Universal Value should

Universal Value make clear why the property is considered to

merit inscription on the World Heritage List (see

Paragraphs 154-

157 of the Operational

It may be a unique survival of a

Guidelines).

particular building form or habitat or designed

town. It may be a particularly fine or early or rich

survival and it may bear witness to a vanished

culture, way of life or eco-system. It may

comprise assemblages of threatened endemic

species, exceptional eco-systems, outstanding

la

ndscapes or other natural phenomena.

The property should be compared to similar

3.c Comparative analysis (including state of properties, whether on the World Heritage List or

conservation of similar properties) not. The comparison should outline the

similarities the nominated property has with other

properties and the reasons that make the

nominated property stand out. The comparative

104 Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention

Format for the nomination of properties for inscription

on the World Heritage List Annex 5

NOMINATION FORMAT EXPLANATORY NOTES

The statement of integrity and/or authenticity

3.d Integrity and/or Authenticity should demonstrate that the property fulfils the

conditions of integrity and/or authenticity set out

in Section II.D of the Operational Guidelines,

which describe these conditions in greater detail.

In the case of a cultural property it should also

record whether repairs have been carried out using

materials and methods traditional to the culture, in

conformity with the Nara Document (1995) (see

Annex 4).

In the case of natural properties it should record

any intrusions from exotic species of fauna or

flora and any human activities that could

compromise the integrity of the property.

4. State of Conservation and factors

affecting the Property The information presented in this section

4.a Present state of conservation constitutes the base-line data necessary to monitor

the state of conservation of the nominated

property in the future. Information should be

provided in this section on the physical condition

of the property, any threats to the Outstanding

Universal Value of the property and conservation

132)

m

easures at the property (see Paragraph

For example, in a historic town or area, buildings,

monuments or other structures needing major or

minor repair works, should be indicated as well as

the scale and duration of any recent or

fo

rthcoming major repair projects.

In the case of a natural property, data on species

trends or the integrity of eco-systems should be

provided. This is important because the

nomination will be used in future years for

purposes of comparison to trace changes in the

c

ondition of the property.

For the indicators and statistical benchmarks used

to monitor the state of conservation of the

pr

operty see section 6 below.

This section should provide information on all the

4.b Factors affecting the property factors which are likely to affect or threaten the

Outstanding Universal Value of a property. It

should also describe any difficulties that may be

encountered in addressing such problems. Not all

the factors suggested in this section are

appropriate for all properties. They are indicative

and are intended to assist the State Party to

identify the factors that are relevant to each

sp

ecific property. 105

Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention


PAGINE

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PESO

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AUTORE

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DESCRIZIONE DISPENSA

The Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention aim to facilitate the implementation of the Convention concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage by setting forth the procedure for:
- the inscription of properties on the World Heritage List and the List of World Heritage in Danger;
- the protection and conservation of World Heritage properties;
- the granting of International Assistance under the World Heritage Fund;
- the mobilization of national and international support in favor of the Convention.


DETTAGLI
Corso di laurea: Corso di laurea magistrale in restauro, conservazione e valorizzazione dei beni architettonici e ambientali
SSD:
A.A.: 2011-2012

I contenuti di questa pagina costituiscono rielaborazioni personali del Publisher Atreyu di informazioni apprese con la frequenza delle lezioni di Aspetti teoretici e tecnici della conservazione e studio autonomo di eventuali libri di riferimento in preparazione dell'esame finale o della tesi. Non devono intendersi come materiale ufficiale dell'università Mediterranea - Unirc o del prof Di Stefano Maurizio.

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